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I have a piece of code which will invert all the checkboxes on my form. I have multiple elements (not just checkboxes but also <input type='text'>'s) in it. The reason I need it to be optimised is because it takes about two to three seconds to select all the checkboxes (275 right now).

Here's my code:

function FormInverse() {
    var iCheckbox = 1; // Because there are multiple input elements, we need to distinquish the input element ID and the row id
    var FormLength = document.FormFacturen.elements.length;
    for (i=0; i < FormLength; i++) {
        var FormElementType = document.FormFacturen.elements[i].type;
        if (FormElementType == "checkbox") {
            var Elements = document.getElementsByClassName('row' + iCheckbox); // Alle elementen in de array zetten
            var iNumElements = Elements.length;
            for (iElement=0; iElement < iNumElements; iElement++) {
                if (document.FormFacturen[i].checked == true) {
                    Elements[iElement].className = "invoice-tr-standard row" + iCheckbox;
                } else {
                    Elements[iElement].className = "invoice-tr-clicked row" + iCheckbox;
                }
            }
            iCheckbox++;
            document.FormFacturen[i].checked = !document.FormFacturen[i].checked;
        }
    }   
}

And here is the document.getElementsByClassName function:

document.getElementsByClassName = function(cl) {
    var retnode = [];
    var myclass = new RegExp('\\b'+cl+'\\b');
    var elem = document.getElementsByTagName('*');
    for (var i = 0; i < elem.length; i++) {
        var classes = elem[i].className;
        if (myclass.test(classes)) retnode.push(elem[i]);
    }
    return retnode;
};
share|improve this question

closed as primarily opinion-based by ThinkingStiff, Qantas 94 Heavy, soldier.moth, sashkello, blunderboy Mar 3 at 4:14

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Any reason why you wouldn't leverage something like jQuery? This type of scripting is so much simpler in jQuery. –  Josh Aug 18 '11 at 11:28
    
@Josh because I have never really worked with jQuery so I'm not experienced with it. If it end-result is that it's going to be faster, then it's ok. –  Devator Aug 18 '11 at 11:29
1  
I'd definitely check to see if the browser already implements document.getElementsByClassName() or the Selectors API and use these if they exist and fall back to your function if they don't. They are likely to be considerably faster. –  Russ Cam Aug 18 '11 at 11:37
    
This question should be moved to codereview.stackexchange.com –  blunderboy Mar 3 at 4:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would suggest using jQuery as well.

Try this:

Add a reference to jQuery:

<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.6.2/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript" language="JavaScript"></script>

Use this code:

$(':checkbox').each( function() {
  $(this).attr('checked', !$(this).attr('checked'));
});

Edited: Or use this to change the classes as well:

$(':checkbox').each(function() {
    var checked = $(this).attr('checked');
    if (checked) {
        $(this).attr('checked', false);
        $(this).addClass('invoice-tr-clicked');
        $(this).removeClass('invoice-tr-standard');        
    }
    else {
        $(this).attr('checked', true);
        $(this).addClass('invoice-tr-standard');
        $(this).removeClass('invoice-tr-clicked');
    }
});

Final version:

$('#FormFacturen :checkbox').each(function() {
    var checked = $(this).attr('checked');
    if (checked) {
        $(this).attr('checked', false);
        $(this).parents('tr').addClass('invoice-tr-clicked');
        $(this).parents('tr').removeClass('invoice-tr-standard');        
    }
    else {
        $(this).attr('checked', true);
        $(this).parents('tr').addClass('invoice-tr-standard');
        $(this).parents('tr').removeClass('invoice-tr-clicked');
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
And how would I change the class then? See my first post from this line: for (iElement=0; iElement < iNumElements; iElement++) { –  Devator Aug 18 '11 at 11:47
    
You could add this: $(':checkbox:checked').attr('class', 'invoice-tr-standard row'); $(':checkbox:not(:checked)').attr('class', 'invoice-tr-clicked row'); –  Tejo Aug 18 '11 at 11:55
    
Thanks, but the row is normally passed through Javascript ("invoice-tr-standard row" + iCheckbox;) and I still need to keep that id iCheckbox send with it (it's different per row). –  Devator Aug 18 '11 at 12:04
    
Sorry, I didn't see that one. Do you have the row + iCheckbox set already or is it only done in this function? I updated the code, so that is does not change the row + iCheckbox class/ –  Tejo Aug 18 '11 at 12:23
    
Thank you, that should work I guess. But how would I call this function? I have a simple <td> field with an onClick function on it which normally called the FormInverse() function. –  Devator Aug 18 '11 at 12:30

Each call to getElementsByClassName is expensive, and it is being called on each pass of your for loop.

In addition to @Geoff's suggestion, you could call document.getElementsByTagName('input'); just once, instead of each time getElementsByClassName is called and cache the result for use within your loop.

That would require making a small modification to your getElementsByClassName function whereby it accepts an array of elements to search through.

document.getElementsByClassName = function(cl, eles) {
    var retnode = [];
    var myclass = new RegExp('\\b'+cl+'\\b');
    var len = eles.length;
    for (var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        var classes = eles[i].className;
        if (myclass.test(classes)) retnode.push(eles[i]);
    }
    return retnode;
};


function FormInverse() {
    // cache all inputs
    var inputs = document.getElementsByTagName("input");
    ...
    // later
    var Elements = document.getElementsByClassName('row' + iCheckbox, inputs); 
share|improve this answer
    
I tried it, but it didn't work. It's still slow. Maybe it's because I'm changing the tr class aswell? –  Devator Aug 18 '11 at 11:46

You should look into a library like JQuery. It will handle this kind of thing well.

There are a lot of little things you can do to improve your code though. First thing I notice is that your getElementsByClassName function is looping through ALL elements on your page every time you call it. You could change this line:

var elem = document.getElementsByTagName('*');

to just get the input elements:

var elem = document.getElementsByTagName('input');
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, it has been reduced by 50% (but it's still a fat second - so it's still too slow to use). –  Devator Aug 18 '11 at 11:38

I am pretty much sure the bottleneck here is the getElementsByClassName function, the browser needs to re-scan the whole html each time to find your element. I suggest you give your elements a unique id id="row1", id="row2", ... instead of a unique class name and use getElementById which is much faster.

 var Elements = document.getElementsById('row' + iCheckbox);
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not able to use this method since my id's are not unique. See this link for more information about why I am not able to use this. –  Devator Aug 18 '11 at 12:32
    
@Devator I posted an answer to your other question that will solve your problem here too. –  nobody Aug 18 '11 at 12:46

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