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I've two lists A and B. I'd like to find out indexes of elements in A that match elements of listB. Something like this:

ArrayList listA = new ArrayList();
listA.add(1);listA.add(2);listA.add(3);listA.add(4);
ArrayList listB = new ArrayList();
listB.add(2);listB.add(4);
ArrayList listC = new ArrayList();
for(int i=0; i<listB.size();i++) {
   int element = listB.get(i);
   for(int j=0; j<listA.size(); j++) {
      if(listA.get(j) == element) listC.add(j);
   }
}

I guess that's one ugly way to doing it. What is the best way to finding all the indexes of A that match all elements in B? I believe there exists a method called containsAll in collections api - don't think it returns matching indexes.

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2  
Can either list contain duplicate values? –  mre Aug 18 '11 at 12:35
    
Is there a reason Set's won't work? download.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/util/Set.html –  madmik3 Aug 18 '11 at 12:40
    
I'd guess they can't ..contain duplicate values. –  Jay Aug 18 '11 at 12:51
    
I need indexes of the elements - using a Set is going to be same as using List? –  Jay Aug 18 '11 at 12:52

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you had to use an ArrayList, you could create a HashSet from the ArrayList. This would make the call to contains O(1). It would take O(n) to create the HastSet. If you could start with a HashSet, that would be best.

public static void main(String[] args) 
{
    List listA = new ArrayList();
    listA.add(1);
    listA.add(2);
    listA.add(3);
    listA.add(4);
    List listB = new ArrayList();
    listB.add(2);
    listB.add(4);
    Set hashset = new HashSet(listA);

    for(int i = 0; i < listB.size(); i++) 
    {
        if(hashset.contains(listB.get(i))) 
        {
            listC.add(i);
            System.out.println(i);
        }
    }   
}
share|improve this answer
    
this looks efficient. –  Jay Aug 18 '11 at 13:04
    
contains() is not so efficient. –  DwB Aug 18 '11 at 13:08
    
so.. there is no way to this other than a minimum complexity of O(n)? –  Jay Aug 18 '11 at 13:11
    
looping through n elements in list A and looping through m elements in list B for each element in list A seems to be less efficient than O(n) to me. –  DwB Aug 18 '11 at 13:20
    
looping through n elements in list A happens when you create a HashSet? –  Jay Aug 18 '11 at 13:24

The Guava libraries come with a method

"SetView com.google.common.collect.Sets.intersection(Set a, Set b)

that will give the elements contained in both sets, but not the indexes. Although it should be easy to get the indexes afterwards.

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2  
third party libraries for a simple thing as this? –  Jay Aug 18 '11 at 12:52
    
@Jay, yes, that's Java... I can imagine writing a very straightforward line of LINQ if I were in C# world for a change... –  Peter Perháč Aug 18 '11 at 12:59

Simple:

List<Integer> listA = new ArrayList<Integer>();
listA.add(1);
listA.add(2);
listA.add(3);
listA.add(4);

List<Integer> listB = new ArrayList<Integer>();
listB.add(2);
listB.add(4);

List<Integer> listC = new ArrayList<Integer>();

for ( Integer item : listA ) {
    int index = listB.indexOf( item );
    if ( index >= 0 ) {
        listC.add(index);
    }
}

But this only works if there is no repetition, if there are repeated indexes you have to do it the way you did, navigating the full list.

EDIT

I thought you wanted the elements, not indexes, sets are not going to give you indexes, only the elements.

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what is the time complexity of using contains() method here? Secondly, I need the indexes not the actual elements at these indexes. –  Jay Aug 18 '11 at 12:49
    
contains is an O(n) operation. –  Maurício Linhares Aug 18 '11 at 12:52
    
that's linear complexity. What about finding indexes? –  Jay Aug 18 '11 at 12:56
    
Updated answer and your question title to say indexes instead of matching items. –  Maurício Linhares Aug 18 '11 at 13:02

Assuming there's no duplicate values, why not use ArrayList.indexOf?


public final class ArrayListDemo {
    public static void main(String[]args){
        findIndices(createListA(), createListB());      
    }

    private static final List<Integer> createListA(){
        List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        list.add(1);
        list.add(3);
        list.add(5);

        return list;
    }

    private static final List<Integer> createListB(){
        List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        list.add(0);
        list.add(2);
        list.add(3);
        list.add(4);

        return list;
    }

    private static void findIndices(List<Integer> listA, List<Integer> listB){
        for(int i = 0; i < listA.size(); i++){  
            // Get index of object in list b
            int index = listB.indexOf(listA.get(i));

            // Check for match
            if(index != -1){
                System.out.println("Found match:");
                System.out.println("List A index = " + i);
                System.out.println("List B index = " + index);
            }
        }
    }
}

Output

Found match:
List A index = 1
List B index = 2
share|improve this answer
    
the indexOf method has a good complexity to it? –  Jay Aug 18 '11 at 13:10
    
the get runs in constant time (i.e. O(1)) and indexOf runs in linear time (i.e. O(n)). –  mre Aug 18 '11 at 13:12
    
the for loop means - you'll be doing indexOf as many times as the number of elements in A - Do you think SwDevMan81's answer below is more efficient? –  Jay Aug 18 '11 at 13:19
    
@Jay, It would appear so. –  mre Aug 18 '11 at 13:21

If list A and list B are sorted in the same order (I'll assume ascending, but descending works as well) this problem has an O(n) solution. Below is some (informal, and untested) code. When the loop exits, indexMap should contain the indices of every element in list A that match an element in list B and the index of the matched element in list B.

  int currentA;
  int currentB;
  int listAIndex = 0;
  int listBIndex = 0;
  Map<Integer, Integer> indexMap = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>();

  currentA = listA.get(listAIndex);
  currentB = listB.get(listBIndex);
  while ((listAIndex < listA.length) && (listBIndex < listB.length))
  {
    if (currentA == currentB)
    {
      indexMap.put(listAIndex, listBIndex);
      ++listAIndex;
    }
    else if (currentA < currentB)
    {
      ++listAIndex;
    }
    else // if (currentA > currentB)
    {
      ++listBIndex;
    }
  }

share|improve this answer
    
if the lists are not sorted, I guess - the additional complexity involved in sorting would add up to the total complexity, wouldn't it? –  Jay Aug 18 '11 at 13:22
    
The complexity becomes the least efficient of the sort vs O(n). Usually that will mean the the complexity of the sort. –  DwB Aug 18 '11 at 13:37

Using Apache CollectionUtils, there are plenty of options

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