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Can this function be improved upon to make it more efficient?:

private unsafe uint GetValue(uint value, int bitsToGrab, int bitsToMoveOver)
        {
            byte[] bytes = BitConverter.GetBytes(value);

            uint myBitMask = 0x80;  //MSB of 8 bits (byte)
            int arrayIndex = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < bitsToMoveOver; i++)
            {
                if (myBitMask == 0)
                {
                    arrayIndex++;
                    myBitMask = 0x80;
                }

                myBitMask >>= 1;
            }

            uint outputMask1 = (uint)(1 << (bitsToGrab - 1));
            uint returnVal = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < bitsToGrab; i++)
            {
                if (myBitMask == 0)
                {
                    arrayIndex++;
                    myBitMask = 0x80;
                }

                if ((bytes[arrayIndex] & myBitMask) > 0)
                {
                    returnVal |= outputMask1;
                }

                outputMask1 >>= 1;
                myBitMask >>= 1;
            }

            return returnVal;
        }

i have an array of uints. each uint contains multiple pieces of data. In order to get the information, i pass in the number of bits, and the offset of those bits. Using that information, i build an output value. The offset is generally on a byte boundary, but i cannot guarantee that it will be.

I'm actually really looking to see if i can simplify the code. Am i unnecessarily verbose in the code, or could it be done a bit cleaner?

Updated function: How do you guys feel about this?

private unsafe uint GetValue(uint value, int bitsToGrab, int bitsToMoveOver)
        {
            if (bitsToGrab + bitsToMoveOver >= 32)
            {
                return 0;
            }

            byte[] bytes = BitConverter.GetBytes(value);
            Array.Reverse(bytes);
            uint newValue = BitConverter.ToUInt32(bytes, 0);

            uint grabMask = (0xFFFFFFFF << (32 - bitsToGrab));
            grabMask >>= bitsToMoveOver;

            uint returnVal = (newValue & grabMask) >> (32 - bitsToMoveOver - bitsToGrab);
            return returnVal;
}
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Can you briefly describe what you're trying to achieve, as bit shifting/masking is not really intuitive –  Hassan Aug 18 '11 at 13:36

1 Answer 1

This needs testing (and assumes that bitsToGrab + bitsToMoveOver <= 32), but I think you can do this:

uint grabMask = ~(0xFFFFFFFF << (bitsToGrab + bitsToMoveOver));
return (value & grabMask) >> bitsToMoveOver;

Since the OP has indicated that it should be sampling bits from an internal binary representation of the number (including endian encoding), with byte order swapping within each word, you can swap bytes first like this:

uint reorderedValue = ((value << 8) & 0xFF00FF00) | ((value >> 8) & 0x00FF00FF);
uint grabMask = ~(0xFFFFFFFF << (bitsToGrab + bitsToMoveOver));
return (reorderedValue & grabMask) >> bitsToMoveOver;
share|improve this answer
    
the threshold def needs to be checked. Given the input value of 2921803, 16 bits to grab, and 0 to move over, I'm expecting the output value of: 19349. I believe the crux is that although the data is being passed in as a uint, it needs to be treated as a byte[], and therefore converted to that, which will move the bytes around. –  Jason Aug 18 '11 at 13:58
    
Ramhound - a byte by definition is a unsigned 8-bit integer. the fact that i am not sending bitsToGrab/bitsToMoveOver as unsigned is irrelevant to the stated problem. –  Jason Aug 18 '11 at 14:21
    
@Dan Bryant - you have the correct answer in the wrong byte order. I am working on a fix now. –  Jonathan Dickinson Aug 18 '11 at 15:05
    
@Jonathan, The new code does generate 19349 from 2921803. I believe this is a mixed endian representation (which is a tad odd, granted.) –  Dan Bryant Aug 18 '11 at 15:15
    
Here is a byte order tweaked version - gist.github.com/1154295. It might be wrong so someone should check it. (I didn't want to steal Dan's answer because he is correct). –  Jonathan Dickinson Aug 18 '11 at 15:20

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