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I have a div that is as high as the window and about 4 times as wide (it is stretched horizontally by elements inside it).

And then this other <div> inside it, which is supposed to be as wide width:100% as its parent (it's for a background picture).

However, the child <div> is only as wide as the window and doesn't quite fill up its parent. This happens in all browsers I've tried.

Why is that, and how can I fix it ?

Source :

<style>
.parent
{
width:100%;
height:100%;
overflow-x:scroll;
overflow-y:hidden;
position:absolute;
top:0;
left:0;
background-color:#999;
}

.child
{
width:100%;
height:200px;
position:absolute;
bottom:0;
left:0;
background-color:#000;
color:#fff;
}

.stretcher
{
width:10000px;
height:32px;
position:absolute;
}
</style>

<div class="parent">
  <div class="child">this should stretch as much as its parent !</div>
  <div class="stretcher">this is some content that defines the page's width</div>
</div>

JSFiddle

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You could give .stretcher a border. I don't think what you are trying to do works in every browser. –  TFennis Aug 18 '11 at 14:10
    
Well it's just a shortened version of my actual code, the real stretcher is a bunch of absolutely positioned divs. I only tested the short version in Firefox. –  Orteil Aug 18 '11 at 14:17
    
I added a JSFiddle to the OP. –  Sparky Aug 18 '11 at 14:51
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The .stretcher div will not expand the parent as position: absolute takes the element out of the page flow so its width has no effect on the parent. Child is behaving properly and expanding to the width of the parent. You can see this clearly if you use Firebug or similar.

As for how to fix it, not sure exactly what you're trying to accomplish with the stretcher div and why you don't just give the parent the width. Perhaps you could expand a bit on what you're trying to do with this structure.

share|improve this answer
    
Hm, well I ended up giving a fixed width to the container. I wanted it to have a dynamic width, but I guess that'll work for now. I must say, however, that the stretcher does expand its parent in the code I posted; the child is still only as wide as the window, but the stretcher and parent go on for 10000px. –  Orteil Aug 19 '11 at 13:24
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Maybe the outside <div> should be positioned relative. The inside <div> can be absolute but you may want to try adding right:0px; as well as left:0px which you already have. I would avoid absolute positioning unless there is no other way to do it.

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Setting the outside div as relative didn't help, nor did adding right:0px;. Oddly, adding the right didn't even align the inside div to the right edge of its parent. –  Orteil Aug 18 '11 at 14:41
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I'm not sure why the child <div> doesn't fill the parent, but in order for it to work you need to wrap the .stretcher <div> around both the parent and child <div>.

Source:

    <style>
        .parent {
            width:100%;
            height:100%;
            overflow-x:scroll;
            overflow-y:hidden;
            position:absolute;
            top:0;
            left:0;
            background-color:#999;
            }

        .child {
            width:100%;
            height:200px;
            position:absolute;
            bottom:0;
            background-color:#000;
            color:#fff;
            }

        .stretcher {
            width:10000px;
            height:100%;
            position:absolute;
            }

    <div class="stretcher">
        <div class="parent"><p>this is some content that defines the page's width</p>
            <div class="child">this should stretch as much as its parent !</div>
        </div>
    </div>
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