Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having trouble understanding the behavior of the return built-in in bash. Here is a sample script.

#!/bin/bash

dostuff() {
    date | while true; do
        echo returning 0
        return 0
        echo really-notreached
    done

    echo notreached
    return 3
}

dostuff
echo returncode: $?

The output of this script is:

returning 0
notreached
returncode: 3

If, however, the date | is removed from line 4, the output is as I expected:

returning 0
returncode: 0

It seems like the return statement as used above is acting the way I thought the break statement ought to behave, but only when the loop is on the right hand side of a pipe. Why is this the case? I couldn't find anything to explain this behavior in the bash man page or online. The script acts the same way in bash 4.1.5 and dash 0.5.5.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

In the date | while ... scenario, that while loop is executed in a subshell due to the presence of the pipe. Thus, the return statement breaks the loop and the subshell ends, leaving your function to carry on.

You'll have to reconstruct the code to remove the pipeline so that no subshells are created:

dostuff() {
    # redirect from a process substitution instead of a pipeline
    while true; do
        echo returning 0
        return 0
        echo really-notreached
    done < <(date)

    echo notreached
    return 3
}
share|improve this answer

But return should terminate a function call, not a subshell. exit is intended to terminate (sub)shell. I think, it's some undocumented bug/feature.

  • echo|return typed in commandline gives an error, that's correct - return should be in a function.
  • f(){ echo|return; } is accepted in the bash/dash, but return doesn't terminate a function call.

    If return terminates a subshell, it would work outside a function. So, conclusion is: return terminates a subshell in a function which is strange.

  • share|improve this answer
        
    Here's a demo that supports the conclusion: function foo { echo start function; ( echo start subshell; return; echo end subshell); echo end function; } –  glenn jackman Jul 15 '13 at 15:18

    The thing is: the subshell is a separate process It doesn't really have a way to say to the parent shell: "I'm exiting because of a return"

    There is no such thing in the exit status which is the only thing the parent shell gets.

    share|improve this answer

    Your Answer

     
    discard

    By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

    Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.