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I have a class written in ~1000 lines of Java code that migrates one database over to another. It has 19 methods for each table being copied over, and 1 which load's the special JDBC driver for Filemaker.

I'm looking at this and can't help thinking I've been really stupid here, and just let my urge to call a few methods from a onActionPerformed govern the 'design'. I trimmed out what I could, but it still looks a lot for what it's essentially doing.

So here's the gist:

public static void companyInsert() throws SQLException{
// This loads the JDBC drivers, gets the connections, turns off auto commit and returns a createStatement()
query = classname.Connect();

try {
  results = query.executeQuery("SELECT * from table");

  // Iterate through the results and print them to standard output
System.out.println("Starting Customers");

stmt = con.prepareStatement("INSERT ignore INTO table (idone, idtwo) values (?, ?)");

while (results.next()) {
    String fname = results.getString("field 1");
    String lname = results.getString("field 2");
 // System.out.println("Found user \"" + fname + " " + lname + "\"");
     stmt.setString(1, fname);
  stmt.setString(2, lname);
  stmt.addBatch();
  }
  // submit the batch for execution
   int[] updateCounts = stmt.executeBatch();
   System.out.println("Update count: " + updateCounts);
  con.commit();
  stmt.close();
  System.out.println("Completed Customers");
}
catch (BatchUpdateException be) {
//handle batch update exception
int[] counts = be.getUpdateCounts();
for (int i = 0; i < counts.length; i++) {
    System.out.println("Statement["+i+"] :"+counts[i]);
}
con.rollback();
}catch (SQLException e) {

//handle SQL exception
con.rollback();
}
 }

There's 19 of these methods, with only the sql parts changing (there are also more fields being set for other records, with some also being retrieved as dates). Hope someone has some great idea - if I could just tear out that catch section (this is always the same) then that would be enough!

Thanks, Paul S

share|improve this question
    
Is this throwaway code? –  Augusto Aug 18 '11 at 15:47
4  
Have you ever heard of an ORM and/or Hibernate and/or JPA? It does among others exactly that (removing the JDBC boilerplate). –  BalusC Aug 18 '11 at 15:47
    
Agree with BalusC. JPA is now a standard way to work with database in Java. I use JDBC occasionaly only for hardcore legacy sql selects. Using JPA will incredibly reduce your current code. –  jirka.pinkas Aug 18 '11 at 15:52
    
@Augusto I have nothing preventing me from throwing this away, but this began from copying over an application doing the same job in VB.net (I decided to swap OS and languages a few months back) - I remembered doing Java years back in freshers and it actually has been pretty enjoyable coming back to it –  Paul Sellars Aug 18 '11 at 15:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Take a look at the template method pattern or, like BalusC suggested, Hibernate.

share|improve this answer

a simple approach would be to have an exception handler...

private void handleException(Exception e, Connection con) throws SQLException {
    if (e instanceof BatchUpdateException) {
        BatchUpdateException be = (BatchUpdateException) e;
        //handle batch update exception
        int[] counts = be.getUpdateCounts();
        for (int i = 0; i < counts.length; i++) {
            System.out.println("Statement["+i+"] :"+counts[i]);
        }
        con.rollback();
    }
    else if (e instanceof SQLException) {
        con.rollback();
    }
}

... and then your code does this:

try {
    //... jdbc code
}
catch (Exception e) {
    handleException(e, con);
}

...or you could go for a bit more refactoring and apply a design pattern such as the 'template method'.

share|improve this answer
    
I ended up using this Exception handling method in conjunction with the template method, thanks a load to everyone who contributed! –  Paul Sellars Aug 19 '11 at 8:53

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