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I have a simple question regarding PHP Classes.

Multiple times I have seen other class-frameworks etc use method calls like.

$post->data->text();

I like this functionality, rather than just doing something like this.

$post->dataReturnAsText();

But i'm not quite sure how they created this functionality to have perhaps a 'sub-method'? Hope someone can point me in the right direction....

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The example you provide has nothing special:

<?php

class Post{
    public $data;
}

class Data{
    public function text(){
    }
}

$post = new Post;
$post->data = new Data;
$post->data->text();

However, you've probably found it in the context of method chaining (very popular in JavaScript libraries):

<?php

class Foo{
    public function doThis(){
        return $this;
    }

    public function doThat(){
        return $this;
    }
}

$foo = new Foo;
$foo->doThis()->doThat()->doThis();
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In this case, data is simply a attribute of the class, and it contains another object:

class data
{
    public function text()
    {
    }
}

class thing
{
    public $data;
}

$thing = new thing();
$thing->data = new data();
$thing->data->text();
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its probably a just that the "data" is a a public property of $post containing an object wth a text property for example :

class Textable {
    public $text;

    function __construct($intext) {
      $this->text = $intext;
    } 
}

class Post {

  public $data;

  function __construct() {
      $data = new Textable("jabberwocky");
  } 

}

this will allow you to do :

$post = new Post();
echo( $post->data->text ); // print out "jabberwocky"

of course the right OOP way is to make the property private and allow access useing a getter function but that besides the point...

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