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There is a ton of information on how to do this, but since "there is more than one way to skin a cat", and all the tutorials/manuals that cover a bit of the process seem to make certain assumptions which are different from other tutorials, I still didn't manage to grasp it.

So far this is what I think I understood.

  1. My final goal should be that of creating a "binary" .deb package. Such package will be platform independend (32/64 bit) as all python programs are such.
  2. To create a "binary" package I need first to create a source package.
  3. To create the source package I can use either CDBS or debhelper. Debhelper is the recommended way for beginners.
  4. The core of creating a source package is populating the DEBIAN directory in the source directory with a number of files clarifying where files need to be copied, what copyright and licensing scheme they are subject to, what dependencies they have, etc...
  5. Step #4 can be largely automated the dh_makecommand if the python source also comes with a distutils' setup.py script.

Now my questions:

  1. Is my understanding of the process correct? Is there anything I am missing, or anything that I got wrong?
  2. Step #5 is really the more confusing to me: specifically the two points that remains most obscure to me are:
    • How do I write a setup.py script that install a stand-alone programme? EDIT: By standalone rogramme I mean a program intended to be used by a desktop user (as opposed to a module which I understand like a collection of functionality to be used by other software after having been imported). In my specific case I would actually need two such "programs": the main software and a separate utility (in effect a second "program" that should be in the same package with the other one).
    • What are the specificities of such a script for DEB packages? The official documentation only seems to deal with RPM and Windows stuff...

BTW: These are the best sources of information that I could find myself so far. If you have anything better than this, please share! :)

share|improve this question
    
Before you can prepare a python program for binary packaging, you need to prepare it for general distribution. That's the setup.py bit. This is comparable to the autotools step many GNU C/C++ projects use, but specific to python. This is easier than it sounds, read docs.python.org/distutils/index.html –  IfLoop Aug 18 '11 at 16:21
1  
@TokenMacGuy - Thank you, I already got the general idea (my wording may be incorrect, but that's the part 5 of the process I describe). What is confusing to me is that in the official documentation I couldn't find an explicit how-to on how to distribute standalone programs rather than modules. Maybe it's just a terminology problem and what I refer to as "standalone programs" are a specific type of modules? –  mac Aug 18 '11 at 16:27
    
@mac: You can install scripts, i.e. executable files to start your program. See docs.python.org/distutils/setupscript.html#installing-scripts –  Thomas K Aug 18 '11 at 16:49
    
@Thomas - I read that before, yet I am still confused: my program has a main.py file (I suppose you might call it "a script") AND a series of modules AND some other YAML and SVG files... I'm still struggling to find clear documentation on how to achieve that. The best I could find so far is the distutils tutorial which I still studying... –  mac Aug 18 '11 at 16:58
    
By standalone program do you mean something that will not have python as a dependency? Recent releases of Debian and Ubuntu both come with at least python 2.6, so if you code is 2.6 compatible, a "standalone program" may in fact just be a special case of a module, as you suggested. –  Wilduck Aug 18 '11 at 17:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

It looks like stdeb will do what you want.

Also, for installing scripts, I strongly recommend distribute's console_scripts entry point support.

share|improve this answer
    
Very very very useful, thank you! (+1) I will test this road in the coming days and report back. –  mac Aug 18 '11 at 19:27
    
That was indeed the way to go (at least for me). Thank you again, answer accepted. –  mac Sep 23 '11 at 7:49
1  
The "distribute's console_scripts" link does not work. –  Czarek Tomczak Dec 27 '13 at 9:30
    
@CzarekTomczak, maybe this will help. –  oblalex Jan 2 at 9:26

This article by Barry Warsaw helped me in getting quite far through the process. I still had to do a lot of searching on the side, though, and I read most of the Ubuntu packaging guide some time in the past.

Having a good setup.py is a really good advice. I found these two guides quite good:

share|improve this answer
    
Note that Hitchhiker's Guide has been replaced by the Python Packaging User Guide. –  Tshepang Jul 23 '13 at 17:14
    
Oh, thanks! Although, they both just cover only the very bare basics of distutils. The Distribute documentation has a bit more details and is the recommended solution (at the time of writing this comment). –  kermit666 Jul 23 '13 at 19:40

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