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I have a html page with a link and onMouseOver of that link I'm calling return escape(showToolTip())

    function showToolTip(){
alert(document.getElementById('toggleFlag'));
        var text;
        alert(document.getElementById('toggleFlag').value);
        if(document.getElementById('toggleFlag').value == false){
            text = 'hide';
            alert('hide');
        }else{
            text = 'show';      
            alert('show');
        }

This function is getting called on page load and when I mouse over I get show. When I mouse out and mouseover again it shows up as 'show' but never calls the function.

Where am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
It doesn't appear you're ever setting toggleFlag's value to false. –  Brian Aug 18 '11 at 16:56
    
Im setting it to false on the onClick function I have for that link..under any case I think I should see the first alert on mouseover –  Mahi Aug 18 '11 at 17:08
    
Hmmm... ignore my answer then because I've got no clue what your question is then :) What do you mean by "the first alert"? Do you mean, the first alert(document.getElementById('toggleFlag))? Do you mean alert(doc.get(toggleFlag).value)? Do you mean alert(show)? More code and more detail might help a lot here. –  Brian Aug 18 '11 at 17:11
    
<a href="#" onclick = "getOrderDetail();return false;" onmouseover="return escape(showToolTip)"> <tr:ds text="${heat.millOrdNum}" />, </a> getOrderDetail function here sets the document.getElementById('toggleFlag') to false –  Mahi Aug 18 '11 at 17:14
    
What's your end goal with "return escape(showToolTip)? You're trying to URL encode a method that doesn't return anything encodable. And without the params on the method, you're never calling it - you're trying to encode the method itself, not its result. –  Brian Aug 18 '11 at 17:17

3 Answers 3

My guess is that when you're setting your event handler, you're including the parenthesis on the method you wish to call.

Such as:

onMouseOver = showTooltip()

This causes the event to fire immediately and the handler to only be given the result of the method that already executed.

If this is the case you'll want to change your event hander by removing the parenthesis.

onMouseOver = showTooltip

As pointed out in the comments below, this isn't accounting for declerative event handling such as:

<div onmouseover="foo()">

which will not fire on page load.

share|improve this answer
    
almost downvoted you for this - you should really be more explicit here and mention that this is only true for imperative, not declarative, event handling. i.e., <div onmouseover="foo();" > is perfectly acceptable and will not fire on load. –  Brian Aug 18 '11 at 17:06
    
Thanks Brian. I've included that piece of info in my answer. –  Jamie Dixon Aug 18 '11 at 17:15
    
+1 for follow-up and a likely cause for someone, if not this guy. –  Brian Aug 18 '11 at 17:21

Again, per my comment, I have no idea what the rest of your implementation looks like, but you're never actually toggling the value of 'toggleValue' in your method...

function showToolTip(){    
     var text;             
     if(document.getElementById('toggleFlag').value == false){       
          // TOGGLE TO TRUE      
          document.getElementById('toggleFlag').value = true;
          text = 'hide';             
          alert('hide');         
     }
     else {            
          // TOGGLE TO FALSE
          document.getElementById('toggleFlag').value = false; 
          text = 'show';                   
          alert('show');         
     } 
}
share|improve this answer

Put quotes around your true and false. You are comparing a string to a js bool rather than the value inside the element.

if(document.getElementById('toggleFlag').value == "false"){
            text = 'hide';
            alert('hide');
        }else{
            text = 'show';      
            alert('show');
        }

A fiddle of what I'm seeing is here: http://jsfiddle.net/k7mJX/

share|improve this answer
    
definitely removed the downvote almost immediately - I was unaware that == vs === was a special exception for boolean values. –  Brian Aug 18 '11 at 17:36
    
eh the answer doesn't fix his immediate issue anyway if he is getting alert boxes on the page load –  scrappedcola Aug 18 '11 at 17:40
    
For testing purposes, I removed everything. I only have a showToolTip function which alerts hello and returns hello. On the mouseover function i called it as onmouseover="return escape(showToolTip());". When i hit the url, I get the hello alert on page laod. –  Mahi Aug 18 '11 at 17:45

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