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I’ve been looking at Smalltalk (VisualWorks) for the past couple of months - and the more I learn the more I’m impressed. However, I think I must be missing something as Smalltalk doesn’t seem to be popular these days - and perhaps it never was.

What do the people who have dropped Smalltalk in favor of Java, C++, Ruby, etc. know that I don’t or in other words “Why isn’t Smalltalk more popular?”

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closed as not constructive by Andrew Barber, Bill the Lizard Dec 22 '12 at 18:14

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35 Answers 35

marketing and business.

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Speaking as someone who has used VisualWorks in school, there are a few things I found annoying. The biggest was the forced (yes, forced) use of the image environment. 2/3 through my project, the image environment crashed while I had a particular window open. That caused the window to come up every time, I opened the environment, despite many efforts to correct this issue. I also found (what I saw as) the weak namespacing and scoping irritating. "Everything is an object" sounds cool until you realize what it means, that 3 + 4 * 7 = 49. And though I understand where duck-typing is coming from, I still strongly prefer static type-checking. The syntax was not that intuitive; I know Java is verbose, but it's actually easy to read and write, especially (obviously) for someone who came form a C/C++ background. This is true even though Java is (almost equally) distinct from C/C++ where it counts (e.g. memory management and object-oriented model).

But I do respect certain aspects, not least the many features it originated, such as strong reflection and powerful closures.

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This is a much-pondered question. In fall there will be a talk about it by Giles Bowkett at ESUG: http://gilesbowkett.blogspot.com/2009/05/upcoming-presentations-in-fall.html.

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I was thought that Smalltalk was born right when there was the AI chrisis. That is: Somewhen during the 70's people realized that AI couldn't solve the problems that were much harder to solve than they thought.

This made a lot of people loose a lot of money and discredited the academics of that time. Suddenly, all the money invested in "academic" languages like LISP or Smalltalk vanished. At the same time, the PC gained strenght, but it wasn't strong enough to run programs in these demanding languages.

The software business then started to listen to hardware vendors and PC-related customers.

No wonder the world turned into an amagam of C++, Fortran, COLBOL and BASIC... It was the begining of the middle ages of SW development...

I was told that there were once Lisp machines with 80 cores... somewhen in the 70's!!!

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I’ve been looking at Smalltalk (VisualWorks) for the past couple of months - and the more I learn the more I’m impressed.

Smalltalk is impressive.

However, I think I must be missing something as Smalltalk doesn’t seem to be popular these days - and perhaps it never was.

You are not missing anything.

What do the people who have dropped Smalltalk in favor of Java, C++, Ruby, etc. know that I don’t or in other words “Why isn’t Smalltalk more popular?”

If by popular you mean that stake holders decide to have major projects developed using Smalltalk you are correct.

Ok, you want to know the real reason that Smalltalk was abandoned. So that programmers that coded a real mess would not have to support their mess. It was far easier to move on than to clean up the mess. Very complex projects were done using Smalltalk.

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