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Below is the program I wrote to find sum of a subarray from given array, however somehow I am not getting how can I get rid of the sentinel value (-32767 in this case)? and how can I optimise it? and how can I keep track of range of max subarray?

#define EVALUE -32767

using namespace std;

int findMaxSubArray(vector<int>,int low,int high);
int findMaxSubArray_Mid(vector<int>,int low,int high);

int main()
{
    vector<int> v;
    int j=0;

    cout << "Enter array values(-32767 to end): ";
    while(1)
    {
        cin >> j;
        if (EVALUE==j)
            break;
        v.push_back(j);
    }

if(v.size()!=0)
    cout << "Max sum is: " << findMaxSubArray(v,0,v.size()-1) << "\n";
else
    cout << "No array elements entered, exiting...\n";

system("pause");
return 0;
}

int findMaxSubArray(vector<int> v, int low, int high)
{
    if(low==high) return v[low];

    int max_mid_sum=findMaxSubArray_Mid(v,low,high);
    int max_left_sum=findMaxSubArray(v,low,(low+high)/2);
    int max_right_sum=findMaxSubArray(v,(low+high)/2+1,high);

    if (max_mid_sum>max_left_sum) return (max_mid_sum>max_right_sum?max_mid_sum:max_right_sum);
    else return(max_left_sum>max_right_sum?max_left_sum:max_right_sum);
}

int findMaxSubArray_Mid(vector<int> v,int low,int high)
{
    int mid=high/2;
    int max_left_sum=0;
    int max_right_sum=0;
    int sum=0;

    for(int i=mid;i>=low;--i)
    {
        sum+=v[i];
        if(sum>max_left_sum)    
        {
            max_left_sum=sum;
        }
    }

    sum=0;
    for(int i=mid+1;i<=high;++i)
    {
        sum+=v[i];
        if(sum>max_right_sum)   
        {
            max_right_sum=sum;
        }
    }

    return (max_right_sum+max_left_sum);
}
share|improve this question
    
did you try j==EVALUE instead? – user195488 Aug 18 '11 at 18:27
    
Thank you for your comment. But, I want to know a way of avoiding use of a hardcoded value like EVALUE here. j==EVALUE wont make any difference... – Tingya Aug 18 '11 at 18:29
    
I don't understand the reason for the arbitrary value but there is nothing wrong with it if that's what you intend to do. – user195488 Aug 18 '11 at 18:39
    
@Code Monkey: I used EVALUE as an indication for my program to stop getting input. – Tingya Aug 20 '11 at 13:16
up vote 4 down vote accepted

When reading from a textfile, the last character that cin will get is the "EOF" character, or end of file character. You can send this character to your program in the command line with control+d. You're going to want to check for this rather than -32767.

This is a basic program that should identify a simple fix for your problem:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    vector<int> v;
    int j;

    cout << "Enter array values (Control+D (EOF) to end): ";
    cin >> j;
    while(cin.good())
    {
        v.push_back(j);
        cin >> j;
    }

    return 0;
}

If you want to get really smart you can use the below and it will directly insert the contents of the memory at cin (from the beginning until EOF) into your vector. As far as running time goes, this will probably be faster than your solution and the above solution.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    vector<int> v;
    cout << "Enter array values (Control+D (EOF) to end): ";

    istream_iterator<int> in(cin);
    istream_iterator<int> eof;
    copy(in, eof, back_inserter(v));

    ostream_iterator<int> out(cout, "\n");
    copy(v.begin(), v.end(), out);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks arasmussen, thats a great trick. – Tingya Aug 18 '11 at 19:24
    
I think you want that first example to be while(cin >> j) { v.push_back(j); }? – Bill Aug 18 '11 at 19:58
    
I believe my first example is correct. It's possible I meant to write while(!cin.eof()) rather than while(!cin.fail()) – arasmussen Aug 18 '11 at 20:02
    
fail() means that the fail- or badbit was set, which is not the same as eof(). Also instead of writing !cin.something() why not just use while(ci.good()) - that's what you'd normally want. good() is basically the same as !fail() && !eof(). – Voo Aug 18 '11 at 20:25
    
Learn something new every day. Thanks! I'll update my post. – arasmussen Aug 18 '11 at 20:41

About the sentinel, IIRC with Control+D you close standard input(may depend of OS). That will cause the << to fail (I am not sure how, probably you'll have to catch an exception).

Anyway, the rest of the code is just a recursive (binomial) adding of the vector. You can sustitute all of it with a simple for

for(int i = 0; i < v.size(); i++) {
  total += v[i]
}

The question about range of max subarray is already managed by the class Vector

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, Ctrl+D is a gr8 idea. – Tingya Aug 18 '11 at 19:29
    
I don't think the sum is right though, as (I think) his comes up with different results than yours if the array contains a negative value. – Mooing Duck Aug 18 '11 at 19:43

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