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I have a table laid out like so:

wins(userid, wins, losses)

I am running a query like so to order the table:

SELECT winloss.userid AS userid, 
(winloss.wins*3) - winloss.losses AS winloss 
FROM site_win_loss AS winloss WHERE winloss.userid 
NOT IN (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 26, 32, 46, 90) ORDER BY winloss DESC

What this does is assigns each user their score, and orders them, in a leader board format. Now in my actual implementation I use a simple php count to place 1, 2, 3 ect beside there names, but I am aware that I can also do this:

SELECT @rownum:=@rownum+1 as rank,
winloss.userid AS userid,
(winloss.wins*3) - winloss.losses AS winloss
FROM site_win_loss AS winloss, 
(select @rownum:=0) a
WHERE winloss.username NOT IN (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 26, 32, 46, 90)
ORDER BY winloss DESC

Now, lets say that the above returns me the following:

rank  | userid  | winloss
1     | 45      | 657
2     | 54      | 587
3     | 26      | 501
4     | 76      | 532
5     | 34      | 476
6     | 63      | 412
7     | 23      | 367
8     | 84      | 314
9     | 41      | 265
10    | 96      | 201

Is there anyway I could grab a specific row above? For example, if I wanted JUST user 41's details above, the SQL statement would return only this:

rank  | userid  | winloss
9     | 41      | 265

Thanks in advance

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I could be misunderstanding, but assuming you're generating a table from your above query, why couldn't you simply query that table using a simple select/where statement to get your specified record? eg,

select *
from #ranktable
where userid = 41
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how exactly would I execute that within the query I'm already running? –  Ferdia O'Brien Aug 18 '11 at 18:34
    
I was imagining you'd nest the above in order to create a temp/permanent table. If that wasn't your plan, you could always put the above in its entirety in a subquery and use the query I included above to get the record you want: select * from ( [your query from above] ) a where a.userid = 41 –  Chris Aug 18 '11 at 18:36
    
Yep, that was it. I think at the time I assumed (incorrectly it seems) that I could do it with some clever WHERE condition. I'll give you the tick as soon as I can click it. You got there first after all. –  Ferdia O'Brien Aug 18 '11 at 18:41
    
Well, you'd need to rank over the entire list before pulling the specific entry, so you'd need to do it as a subquery or stand-alone query. –  Chris Aug 18 '11 at 19:06
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Use an outer query

Select *
FROM(
SELECT @rownum:=@rownum+1 as rank,
winloss.userid AS userid,
(winloss.wins*3) - winloss.losses AS winloss
FROM site_win_loss AS winloss, 
(select @rownum:=0) a
WHERE winloss.username NOT IN (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 26, 32, 46, 90)

)a
where a.userid = 41
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That was exactly it. I'm actually a little upset that I spent so long writing out such a huge question, hahaha. One very small point. I had to add "AS temp" after the closing bracket, as it refused to run without an alias. I think at the time I assumed (incorrectly it seems) that I could do it with some clever WHERE condition. –  Ferdia O'Brien Aug 18 '11 at 18:40
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Another option that works without using a subquery (but may not really be any more efficient), is to use the HAVING clause.

Something like:

SELECT @rownum:=@rownum+1 as rank,
    winloss.userid AS userid,
    (winloss.wins*3) - winloss.losses AS winloss
FROM site_win_loss AS winloss, 
    (select @rownum:=0) a
WHERE winloss.username NOT IN (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 26, 32, 46, 90)
HAVING rank = 9
ORDER BY winloss DESC

However, this has the undesired result of re-calculating rank in the new output, but it should give you the record you want.

EDIT: moved the position of HAVING.

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Assuming a table with thousands upon thousands of users (although by then I'll just be calculating it once an hour in a cron and caching it), which would be more efficient? I like to delay caching for as long as possible as I think users tend to notice it. –  Ferdia O'Brien Aug 18 '11 at 19:36
    
In testing against a table I have with 270,000 records, I find the 'HAVING' statement above returns in 0.12 seconds, and the subquery approach returns in 0.26 seconds. –  Doug Kress Aug 18 '11 at 20:01
    
Here are my two queries: SELECT @rownum:=@rownum+1 as rank, u.uid AS userid, u.access AS winloss FROM users AS u, (select @rownum:=0) a WHERE u.uid NOT IN (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 26, 32, 46, 90) ORDER BY winloss DESC HAVING rank = 9; SELECT * FROM ( SELECT @rownum:=@rownum+1 as rank, u.uid AS userid, u.access AS winloss FROM users AS u, (select @rownum:=0) a WHERE u.uid NOT IN (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 26, 32, 46, 90) ORDER BY winloss DESC ) x WHERE rank = 3; –  Doug Kress Aug 18 '11 at 20:03
    
Hey Doug. Interesting problem. My server doesn't seem to want me to run HAVING after the ORDER BY in my existing query. Any suggestions? –  Ferdia O'Brien Aug 18 '11 at 20:42
    
I'll edit that. HAVING is actually part of GROUP BY (it does work, though). –  Doug Kress Aug 18 '11 at 20:44
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