Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

My file reads:

user_number     diff    id  
1                3      1  
1                4      1  
2                7      1  
359              8      1  
857              9      1  

Here are the command I used and the resulting error:

gnuplot> plot "avg_max_min.csv" using 1:2 with boxes  

                                           ^
Error:      warning: Skipping data file with no valid points  
                                                    ^
             x range is invalid  

Any idea about where the error comes from?

share|improve this question
1  
I tested it, it works for me. – Patrick B. Aug 18 '11 at 19:51
    
Is this the whole data file or just a snapshot? My bet is that you either have a problem with missing data (not specified in your file) or a non-constant field separator (though I doubt it can happen if your csv file was generated from an external app). In any case, check the set datafile separator and set datafile missing commands. – chl Aug 18 '11 at 20:38

To let it works you should change you data file to be

    #user_number     diff    id  
    1                3      1  
    1                4      1  
    2                7      1  
    359              8      1  
    857              9      1  

Gnuplot will treat lines begin with # as comments and will not use at to plot.

share|improve this answer

As pointed out in one of the comments, what you propose works without problems in the latest versions of Gnuplot.

There's also the possibility of telling Gnuplot to start to process the file at the second line, skipping the first:

plot 'avg_max_min.csv' every ::2 using 1:2 with boxes
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.