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Below is my query that I am using:

SELECT 
   County,
   Code,
   Sum(PaidAmount) AS TotalPaid
FROM
   Counties
GROUP BY
   County,
   Code

It returns the set:

County     Code         TotalPaid
Brown      99           210.21
Lyon       73           322.22
Lyon       88           533.22
Lincoln    22           223.21

What I am looking for is a query that will return the rows that show the County and the Code for the Max TotalPaid for each County. An example of the result set that I need is shown below (notice that Lyon, 73 is removed since Lyon, 88 has a higher TotalPaid amount):

County     Code         TotalPaid
Brown      99           210.21
Lyon       88           533.22
Lincoln    22           223.21
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What database is this? Oracle, SQL Server, other? –  Mark Sherretta Aug 18 '11 at 19:46
    
SQL Server 2008 –  Eric R. Aug 18 '11 at 19:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I wasn't able to test this, but RANK should solve this:

SELECT x.County, x.Code x.TotalPaid
    ,RANK() OVER 
    (PARTITION BY x.County ORDER BY x.TotalPaid DESC) AS 'RANK'
FROM

(SELECT 
   County,
   Code,
   Sum(PaidAmount) AS TotalPaid
FROM
   Counties
GROUP BY
   County,
   Code) x
WHERE Rank = 1
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Woo!! Thanks so much! This is what I needed it looks like! –  Eric R. Aug 18 '11 at 19:59

I think you need to do something like the follwoing. I've just been called away before I could review what I've written but hopefully it will give you enough of a pointer. Some RDBMSes won't allow the "where country, TotalPaid = select value, value" construct but you can work around this

select 
   County,
   Code,
   TotalPaid
from (SELECT 
       County,
       Code,
       Sum(PaidAmount) AS TotalPaid
     FROM
       Counties
     GROUP BY
       County,
       Code ) tbl
 where County, TotalPaid = (select County, 
                                 max(TotalPaid)
                             FROM
                                 Counties
                             GROUP BY
                                 County,
                                 Code ) tbl2
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Don't know about SQL Server, but in Oracle the syntax would be where (county,totalpaid) IN (select ...) –  Dave Costa Aug 18 '11 at 19:58
   SELECT 
   c.County,
   c.Code,
   Sum(c.PaidAmount) AS TotalPaid
   FROM
   Counties c
   WHERE
   c.Code in (select max(c2.code) from counties c2 where c2.county = c.county)
   GROUP BY
   c.County,
   c.Code

this one should work although i haven't tested

share|improve this answer
    
He doesn't want the maximum code value, he wants the code that has the maximum TotalPaid within each county. –  Dave Costa Aug 18 '11 at 19:55

You'll have to use windowing functions to do this. While what you want is easily expressed in english, it's not easily expressed in SQL, unfortunately. This should do what you need:

select
    County, Code, TotalPaid
from
(
SELECT 
   County,
   Code,
   sum(PaidAmount) AS TotalPaid
FROM
   Counties
GROUP BY
   County, Code
) source

where (row_number() over (partition by County order by TotalPaid desc)) = 1
share|improve this answer

Here's an updated solution:

select c1.county, c1.code, c1.paidAmount 
from counties c1
inner join (
  select county, max(paidAmount) paidAmount 
  from counties 
  group by county) c2 
on c1.county=c2.county and c1.paidAmount=c2.paidAmount;

Note, if there are multiple max payments for a certain county, this will return all rows that share that maximum.

share|improve this answer
    
That will give me the sum for the Max Code value for each county, which isn't what I want. I want to Display the County and Code for the rows with the Max TotalPaid. –  Eric R. Aug 18 '11 at 19:48
    
@Eric R: Sorry, realized that just after I posted. Looking into the best way of doing that... –  Briguy37 Aug 18 '11 at 19:53
    
@Eric R: Updated my solution. –  Briguy37 Aug 18 '11 at 20:13

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