Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class Animal, and its subclass Dog. I often find myself coding the following lines:

if (animal is Dog)
{
    Dog dog = animal as Dog;    
    dog.Name;    
    ... 
}

For the variable Animal animal;.

Is there some syntax that allows me to write something like:

if (Dog dog = animal as Dog)
{    
    dog.Name;    
    ... 
}
share|improve this question
1  
What would that even mean? What would the bool condition be? –  Kirk Woll Aug 18 '11 at 19:58
    
None that I know of. Any reason not to move Name up to Animal? –  Al G Aug 18 '11 at 19:59
15  
Just a note, code like can often be the result of breaking one of the SOLID Principles. The L - Liskov Substitution Principle. Not saying it's wrong to do what you are doing all the time, but might be worth thinking about. –  ckittel Aug 18 '11 at 20:03
    
please take note of what @ckittel is doing, you probably don't want to do this –  khebbie Aug 19 '11 at 12:43
1  
@Solo no, null != false in C#; C# only allows actual bools or things implicitly convertible to bools in if conditions. Neither nulls nor any of the integer types are implicitly convertible to bools. –  romkyns Aug 24 '11 at 17:14
show 5 more comments

9 Answers

No, there isn't. It's more idiomatic to write this though:

Dog dog = animal as Dog;
if (dog != null)
{
    // Use dog
}

Given that "as followed by if" is almost always used this way, I've jokingly suggested before now that there should be an "as if" operator, but there isn't anything like this in C#.

The problem is that you can't declare a variable in the condition part of an if statement1. The closest approach I can think of is this:

// EVIL EVIL EVIL
for (Dog dog = animal as Dog; dog != null; dog = null)
{
    ...
}

And that's just nasty...

(I've just tried it, and it does work. But please, please don't do this. Oh, and you can declare dog using var of course.)

Of course you could write an extension method:

public static void AsIf<T>(this object value, Action<T> action) where T : class
{
    T t = value as T;
    if (t != null)
    {
        action(t);
    }
}

Then call it with:

animal.AsIf<Dog>(dog => {
    // Use dog in here
});

Or combine the two:

public static void AsIf<T>(this object value, Action<T> action) where T : class
{
    // EVIL EVIL EVIL
    for (var t = value as T; t != null; t = null)
    {
        action(t);
    }
}

EDIT: inspired by a colleague's suggestion, you can use an extension method without a lambda expression in a cleaner way than the for loop:

public static IEnumerable<T> AsOrEmpty(this object value)
{
    T t = value as T;
    if (t != null)
    {
        yield return t;
    }
}

Then:

foreach (Dog dog in animal.AsOrEmpty<Dog>())
{
    // use dog
}

1 You can assign values in if statements, although I rarely do so. It's not terribly unusual for me to do it in a while though when reading streams of data. For example:

string line;
while ((line = reader.ReadLine()) != null)
{
    ...
}

These days I normally prefer to use a wrapper which lets me use foreach (string line in ...) but I view the above as a pretty idiomatic pattern. It's usually not nice to have side-effects within a condition, but the alternatives usually involve code duplication, and when you know this pattern it's easy to get right.

share|improve this answer
64  
+1 for giving an answer and also begging that the OP doesn't use it. Instant classic. –  ckittel Aug 18 '11 at 20:06
8  
@Paul: If I were trying to sell it to anyone, I wouldn't strongly advise them not to use it. I'm just showing what's possible. –  Jon Skeet Aug 18 '11 at 20:16
12  
@Paul: I think that may have been the motivation behind EVIL EVIL EVIL, but I'm not positive. –  Adam Robinson Aug 18 '11 at 20:16
16  
I made a similar extension method (with a bunch of overloads) a while ago and I called them AsEither(...), I think it's a bit clearer than AsIf(...), so I can write myAnimal.AsEither(dog => dog.Woof(), cat => cat.Meeow(), unicorn => unicorn.ShitRainbows()). –  herzmeister Aug 18 '11 at 21:37
87  
That's the best abuse of C# I've seen in a while. Clearly you are an evil genius. –  Eric Lippert Aug 18 '11 at 21:47
show 24 more comments

If as fails, it returns null.

Dog dog = animal as Dog;

if (dog != null)
{
    // do stuff
}
share|improve this answer
    
First, thank you. Second, I want to create the dog variable in the scope of the if statement and not in outer scope. –  michael Aug 18 '11 at 20:10
    
@Michael you cannot do that in an if statement. The if has to have a bool result not an assignment. Jon Skeet provides some nice generic and lambda combinations you may which to consider as well. –  Rodney Foley Aug 18 '11 at 20:13
    
if can have a bool result and an assignment. Dog dog; if ((dog = animal as Dog) != null) { // Use Dog } but that still introduces the variable in the outer scope. –  Thomas G. Mayfield Aug 24 '11 at 17:36
add comment

You can assign the value to the variable, as long as the variable already exists. You can also scope the variable to allow that variable name to be used again later in the same method, if that is a problem.

public void Test()
{
    var animals = new Animal[] { new Dog(), new Duck() };

    foreach (var animal in animals)
    {
        {   // <-- scopes the existence of critter to this block
            Dog critter;
            if (null != (critter = animal as Dog))
            {
                critter.Name = "Scopey";
                // ...
            }
        }

        {
            Duck critter;
            if (null != (critter = animal as Duck))
            {
                critter.Fly();
                // ...
            }
        }
    }
}

assuming

public class Animal
{
}

public class Dog : Animal
{
    private string _name;
    public string Name
    {
        get { return _name; }
        set
        {
            _name = value;
            Console.WriteLine("Name is now " + _name);
        }
    }
}

public class Duck : Animal
{
    public void Fly()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Flying");
    }
}

gets output:

Name is now Scopey
Flying

The pattern of variable assignment in the test is also used when reading byte blocks from streams, for example:

int bytesRead = 0;
while ((bytesRead = fs.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length)) > 0) 
{
    // ...
}

The pattern of variable scoping used above, however, is not a particularly common code pattern and if I saw it being used all over the place I'd be looking for a way to refactor it out.

share|improve this answer
add comment

One of the extension methods I find myself writing and using often* is

public static TResult IfNotNull<T,TResult>(this T obj, Func<T,TResult> func)
{
    if(obj != null)
    {
        return func(obj);
    }
    return default(TResult);
}

Which could be used in this situation as

string name = (animal as Dog).IfNotNull(x => x.Name);

And then name is the dog's name (if it is a dog), otherwise null.

*I have no idea if this is performant. It has never come up as a bottleneck in profiling.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for the note. If it has never come up as a bottleneck in profiling, that's a pretty good sign that it is sufficiently performant. –  Cody Gray Aug 19 '11 at 6:21
    
Why would you take the defaultValue as an argument and let the caller decide what it I z instead of falling back to default (....)? –  1365 Jan 6 at 3:40
add comment

Going against the grain here, but maybe you're doing it wrong in the first place. Checking for an object's type is almost always a code smell. Don't all Animals, in your example, have a Name? Then just call Animal.name, without checking whether it's a dog or not.

Alternatively, invert the method so that you call a method on Animal that does something differently depending on the concrete type of the Animal. See also: Polymorphism.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Shorter Statement

var dog = animal as Dog
if(dog != null) dog.Name ...;
share|improve this answer
    
@ Jonathan- Danke –  jmogera Aug 18 '11 at 23:07
add comment

Here's some additional dirty code (not as dirty as Jon's, though :-)) dependent on modifying the base class. I think it captures the intent while perhaps missing the point:

class Animal
{
    public Animal() { Name = "animal";  }
    public List<Animal> IfIs<T>()
    {
        if(this is T)
            return new List<Animal>{this};
        else
            return new List<Animal>();
    }
    public string Name;
}

class Dog : Animal
{
    public Dog() { Name = "dog";  }
    public string Bark { get { return "ruff"; } }
}


class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var animal = new Animal();

        foreach(Dog dog in animal.IfIs<Dog>())
        {
            Console.WriteLine(dog.Name);
            Console.WriteLine(dog.Bark);
        }
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

The problem (with the syntax) is not with the assignment, as the assignment operator in C# is a valid expression. Rather, it is with the desired declaration as declarations are statements.

If I must write code like that I will sometimes (depending upon the larger context) write the code like this:

Dog dog;
if ((dog = animal as Dog) != null) {
    // use dog
}

There are merits with the above syntax (which is close to the requested syntax) because:

  1. Using dog outside the if will result in a compile error as it is not assigned a value elsewhere. (That is, don't assign dog elsewhere.)
  2. This approach can also be expanded nicely to if/else if/... (There are only as many as as required to select an appropriate branch; this the big case where I write it in this form when I must.)
  3. Avoids duplication of is/as. (But also done with Dog dog = ... form.)
  4. Is no different than "idiomatic while". (Just don't get carried away: keep the conditional in a consistent form and and simple.)

To truly isolate dog from the rest of the world a new block can be used:

{
  Dog dog = ...; // or assign in `if` as per above
}
Bite(dog); // oops! can't access dog from above

Happy coding.

share|improve this answer
    
Point #1 that you offer is the first thing that came to my mind. Declare the variable but only assign in the if. The variable then can't be referenced from outside the if without a compiler error - perfect! –  Ian Yates Oct 1 '13 at 10:57
add comment

If you have to do multiple such as-ifs one after one (and using polymorphism is not an option), consider using a SwitchOnType construct.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.