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I have this string "IP 1.2.3.4 is currently trusted in the white list, but it is now using a new trusted certificate." in a log file. What I need to do is look for this message and extract the IP address (1.2.3.4) from the log file.

import os
import shutil
import optparse
import sys

def main():
    file = open("messages", "r")
    log_data = file.read()
    file.close()

    search_str = "is currently trusted in the white list, but it is now using a new trusted certificate."

    index = log_data.find(search_str)
    print index

    return

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

How do I extract the IP address? Your response is appreciated.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use regular expressions.

Code like this:

import re

compiled = re.compile(r"""
    .*?                                # Leading junk
    (?P<ipaddress>\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)  # IP address
    .*?                                # Trailing junk
    """, re.VERBOSE)
str = "IP 1.2.3.4 is currently trusted in the white list, but it is now using a new trusted certificate."
m = compiled.match(str)
print m.group("ipaddress")

And you get this:

>>> import re
>>> 
>>> compiled = re.compile(r"""
...     .*?                                # Leading junk
...     (?P<ipaddress>\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)  # IP address
...     .*?                                # Trailing junk
...     """, re.VERBOSE)
>>> str = "IP 1.2.3.4 is currently trusted in the white list, but it is now using a new trusted certificate."
>>> m = compiled.match(str)
>>> print m.group("ipaddress")
1.2.3.4

Also, I learned there there is a dictionary of matches, groupdict():

>>>> str = "Peer 10.11.6.224 is currently trusted in the white list, but it is now using a new trusted certificate. Consider removing its likely outdated white list entry."
>>>> m = compiled.match(str)
>>>> print m.groupdict()
{'ipaddress': '10.11.6.224'}

Later: fixed that. The initial '.*' was eating your first character match. Changed it to be non-greedy. For consistency (but not necessity), I changed the trailing match, too.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks it solved my issue, but it doesn't print the IP address correctly. Ihave this message in the log "Peer 10.11.6.224 is currently trusted in the white list, but it is now using a new trusted certificate. Consider removing its likely outdated white list entry." it prints 0.11.6.224, how do I fix this issue –  skokal01 Aug 18 '11 at 21:09

Really simple answer:

msg = "IP 1.2.3.4 is currently trusted in the white list, but it is now using a new trusted certificate."

parts = msg.split(' ', 2)

print parts[1]

results in:

1.2.3.4

You could also do REs if you wanted, but for something this simple...

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1  
You should probably do parts = msg.split(' ', 2) to save scanning the whole string. –  Ross Patterson Aug 18 '11 at 20:39
    
+1 for the simplest thing that could possibly work! –  Johnsyweb Aug 19 '11 at 7:33
1  
@Ross Updated! Didn't know Split had that option. –  Al G Aug 19 '11 at 11:20

There will be dozens of possible approaches, pros and cons depend on the details of your log file. One example, using the re module:

import re
x = "IP 1.2.3.4 is currently trusted in the white list, but it is now using a new trusted certificate."
pattern = "IP ([0-9\.]+) is currently trusted in the white list"
m = re.match(pattern, x)
for ip in m.groups():
    print ip

If you want to print out every instance of that string in your log file, you'd do something like this:

import re
pattern = "(IP [9-0\.]+ is currently trusted in the white list, but it is now using a new trusted certificate.)"
m = re.match(pattern, log_data)
for match in m.groups():
    print match
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. My question should have been how to find that string the log file and print it instead of printing the index. find() only returns the index. –  skokal01 Aug 18 '11 at 20:51
    
If you want to print the entire line, move the paren's from around the "[0-9\.]+" to around the entire string you wish to match. I'll update the post to reflect. –  J.J. Aug 18 '11 at 21:02

Regular expression is the way to go. But if you fill uncomfortably writing them, you can try a small parser that I wrote (https://github.com/hgrecco/stringparser). It translates a string format to a regular expression. In your case, you will do the following:

from stringparser import Parser

parser = Parser("IP {} is currently trusted in the white list, but it is now using a new trusted certificate.")

ip = parser(text)

If you have a file with multiple lines you can replace the last line by:

with open("log.txt", "r") as fp:
    ips = [parser(line) for line in fp]

Good luck.

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