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I'll try to make this simple.

This query lists my sites users, their total orders, cards, and addresses on file.

For some reason if the user has 2 addresses but only 1 order, it will show the customer has 2 orders.

For example: user4 actually only has 1 order, but shows 2 and im assuming its because he has 2 addresses and it has something to do with the joins or grouping.

SELECT
users.user_email,
users.user_firstname,
users.user_lastname,
users.user_joindate,
users.user_logindate,
Count(users_addresses.usera_id) AS count_addr,
Count(users_cards.userc_id) AS count_cards,
Count(orders.order_id) AS count_orders,
Sum(orders.order_total) AS sum_ordertotal
FROM
users
LEFT JOIN users_addresses ON users_addresses.usera_userid = users.user_id
LEFT JOIN users_cards ON users_cards.userc_userid = users.user_id
LEFT JOIN orders ON orders.order_userid = users.user_id
GROUP BY
users.user_id
ORDER BY user_id DESC
LIMIT 5

Example ouput:

userid | orders | addresses | cards
------ ----------------------------
user4  |   2    |     2     |   0
user3  |   0    |     0     |   0
user2  |   1    |     1     |   0
user1  |   0    |     1     |   0
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One possibility is to use COUNT(DISTINCT orders.order_id). However, this doesn't help with the Sum().

Another possibility (albiet less efficient) is to use subqueries for the counts.

SELECT
    users.user_email,
    users.user_firstname,
    users.user_lastname,
    users.user_joindate,
    users.user_logindate,
    (SELECT count(*) FROM users_addresses WHERE users_addresses.usera_id = users.user_id) AS count_addr,
    (SELECT count(*) FROM user_cards WHERE users_cards.userc_id = users.user_id) AS count_cards,
    Count(orders.order_id) AS count_orders,
    Sum(orders.order_total) AS sum_ordertotal
FROM users
LEFT JOIN orders ON orders.order_userid = users.user_id
GROUP BY users.user_id
ORDER BY user_id DESC
LIMIT 5
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DISTINCT worked for the counts and it seems that it worked for the sum as well. thanks! –  tuurbo Aug 18 '11 at 20:44
    
ive checked and doubled checked and when i added DISTINCT to the sum it worked as well. –  tuurbo Aug 18 '11 at 20:46
    
Note that you want to use the distinct key of the table in the count(distinct) - it seems you are using the user_id, which would always return a count of 1. Also, using 'distinct' inside the SUM() may seem to work, but it's actually only summing distinct amounts. If you have two orders with the same amount (for the same user), they won't get counted correctly. –  Doug Kress Aug 18 '11 at 20:46
    
ahh i see. well, i tried the query you have above and both count_addr and count_cards return 0 –  tuurbo Aug 18 '11 at 21:11
    
It looks like I mistyped some of your field names - which should give you an error, not a 0 (unless you have the fields I specified, and they point to something else). Your original query used 'usera_userid' and 'userc_userid', and I've specified 'usera_id' and 'userc_id'. Interesting naming convention you've got there. –  Doug Kress Aug 18 '11 at 21:25
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As suggested before:

count(distinct(orders.order_id)) as count_orders

And you could use:

(select sum(order_total) from orders where user_id = users.user_id) as sum_ordertotal
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