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Is it possible to use the JarSigner class to sign a jar file within java? Currently I am using:

String args[] = {"-keystore", keystore, "-storepass", password, jar, keyname};
JarSigner js = new JarSigner();
js.run(args);

but if anything fails, the js.run void will call a System.exit(-1) causing my entire application to crash. I was thinking about running that inside of a thread, joining it until it completes, and checking for the return code. Just seeing if there is a more formal way of doing that... Any help would be appreciated.

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2  
That won't work. System.exit() will terminate the entire VM, not just the thread that executes it. – Henning Makholm Aug 18 '11 at 21:11
    
is there any way to catch a System.exit? – wuntee Aug 19 '11 at 18:23
    
In principle you could do that by making a custom classloader to load the foreign code, and have it install some bytecode of your own for java.lang.System. But that is not for the faint of heart -- you'd need to handle the chaining of all other System methods to the VM's implementations yourself. It's probably much easier and maintainable simply to recreate the jar signing process yourself with java.util.zip.* and java.security.* tools. – Henning Makholm Aug 19 '11 at 19:10

I suppose you use Sun/Oracle JarSigner included in JDK tools. You have two option:

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If you sign only with SHA1withRSA algorithm, there is a project called zip-signer. The main target of this project is Android, but the core library of this project, "zipsigner-lib", doesn't depend on Android system so it works in PC as well. You can take a look at sample code for PC named zipsigner-cmdline.

If you need algorithms other than SHA1withRSA, though, you'll probably have to adapt source codes from the GNU ClassPath project, which is no easy task.

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