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I am having trouble to figure out, how to sort a vector of vector of strings, here is the testing code.


#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <boost/algorithm/string.hpp>

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  std::vector <std::vector <std::string> > data_var;
  std::vector <std::string> temp;

  std::string str1 = "1,hello3,temp2";
  std::string str2 = "2,hello2,temp1";
  std::string str3 = "3,hello1,temp3";

  boost::split(temp, str1, boost::is_any_of(","));
  data_var.push_back(temp);
  boost::split(temp, str2, boost::is_any_of(","));
  data_var.push_back(temp);
  boost::split(temp, str3, boost::is_any_of(","));
  data_var.push_back(temp);

  // sorting code here...
}

Thanks in advance...

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So... is your sorting code that you commented out broken? Or do you just want us to implement the sorting code for you? –  NG. Aug 18 '11 at 21:38
2  
How do you know if one vector<string> should come before or after another? –  Bill Aug 18 '11 at 21:39
    
@SB: I am not able to figure out how to sort it... –  rda3mon Aug 18 '11 at 21:41
1  
a vector<vector<string>> can be thought of as a two dimensional array of strings, or 3d array of chars. How would you like this sorted? –  Mooing Duck Aug 18 '11 at 21:41
    
@Bill: changed the strings... –  rda3mon Aug 18 '11 at 21:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you only want to sort based on the second column, then you just need to provide a custom comparison operator. Once way to do that is:

struct StringListCompare
{
  bool operator()(const vector<string>& lhs, const vector<string>& rhs)
  {
    // what do we do if lhs or rhs don't have two elements?
    if (lhs.size() < 2 || rhs.size() < 2)
    {
      // ?
    }
    else
    {
      return lhs[1] < rhs[1];
    }
  }
} StringListComparer;

int main()
{
  // ...
  sort(data_var.begin(), data_var.end(), StringListComparer);
}

Edit: If you won't know until runtime which column you'll be sorting on, you can encode that in the sorting object:

class StringListCompare
{
public:
  explicit StringListCompare(int column) : m_column(column) {}
  bool operator()(const vector<string>& lhs, const vector<string>& rhs)
  {
    // what do we do if lhs or rhs don't have (m_column + 1) elements?
    return lhs[m_column] < rhs[m_column];
  }
private:
  int m_column;
};

Notice how we've added a constructor that takes which column it'll act on. You can use it like this:

  // We set it up so the columns are 0-based:
  StringListCompare compare_column_0(0), compare_column_1(1), compare_column_2(2);

  cout << "Original:\n" << data_var << endl;
  sort(data_var.begin(), data_var.end(), compare_column_2);
  cout << "Sorted on column 2:\n" << data_var << endl;
  sort(data_var.begin(), data_var.end(), compare_column_1);
  cout << "Sorted on column 1:\n" << data_var << endl;
  sort(data_var.begin(), data_var.end(), compare_column_0);
  cout << "Sorted on column 0:\n" << data_var << endl;

You don't even need to make the local variable if you don't want to:

  sort(data_var.begin(), data_var.end(), StringListCompare(2));
  cout << "Sorted on 2, no local sort variable:\n" << data_var << endl;

[Code at ideone]

share|improve this answer
    
trying it out... –  rda3mon Aug 18 '11 at 22:02
    
thank you........ it works –  rda3mon Aug 18 '11 at 22:30
    
is there anyway I can pass the column as a parameter to the StringListComparer? –  rda3mon Aug 18 '11 at 23:18
    
@Ringo: It makes the class more complicated, but yes. I'll add a sample. –  Bill Aug 18 '11 at 23:41
    
oh sure, thanks a ton... –  rda3mon Aug 18 '11 at 23:51

Alright: new -simpler- answer, having learned that vectors are comparable:

//sorting code here...
std::sort(data_var.begin(), data_var.end(), std::greater<std::vector<std::string>>());
share|improve this answer
    
how do I specify sort on which column? –  rda3mon Aug 18 '11 at 22:16
1  
This will sort by the first column, then second, then third, etc. If you want a specific column, use Bill's answer, or if you want a specific order, customize my first answer or Bill's answer. –  Mooing Duck Aug 18 '11 at 22:19
2  
You're missing parenthesis after std::greater<std::vector<std::string>> to actually construct the functor. –  ildjarn Aug 18 '11 at 23:16
    
@ildjarn Thanks! –  Mooing Duck Aug 18 '11 at 23:44

I'm going to assume each vector represents an record of some type, and compare the internal strings from left to right. Obviously the sorter() code is easily replaceable. You should to add a sorter() function somewhere to your code, and pass it to the std::sort algorithm.

bool sorter(const std::vector<std::string>& left, const std::vector<std::string>& right)
{
    //go through each column
    for(int i=0; i<left.size() && i<right.size()) {
        // if left is "more" return that we go higher
        if( left[i] > right[i])
            return true;
        // if left is "less" return that we go lower
        else if (left[i] < right[i])
            return false;
    }
    // if left is longer, it goes higher
    if (left.size() > right.size())
        return true;
    else //otherwise, left go lower
        return false;
 }

 int main() {
     std::vector <std::vector <std::string> > data_var;
     //...

     //sorting code here...
     std::sort(data_var.begin(), data_var.end(), sorter);

     //...
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Your 'sorter' comparator is equivalent to the default one. –  Benjamin Lindley Aug 18 '11 at 21:56
    
trying it out... –  rda3mon Aug 18 '11 at 22:02
    
@Benjamin Lindley: I'm pretty sure the default comparer is std::less, which defaults to T::operator<(const T&), which is not overloaded for std::vector. Also, we're going for decreasing order (std::more, if it worked on vectors) –  Mooing Duck Aug 18 '11 at 22:02
1  
You're right, I wasn't reading the signs right. But in fact, operator< is overloaded for vector, as is operator>, so you could use std::greater, or std::less(which would be the default) –  Benjamin Lindley Aug 18 '11 at 22:05
    
@Benjamin: well look at that! I never knew it was! msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/572x098y(v=VS.71).aspx –  Mooing Duck Aug 18 '11 at 22:10

Check out the sort function from algorithm:

template <class RandomAccessIterator> void sort ( RandomAccessIterator first, RandomAccessIterator last );

template <class RandomAccessIterator, class Compare> void sort ( RandomAccessIterator first, RandomAccessIterator last, Compare comp );

Click here for an example + docs

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