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I am kind of oldskool and just getting back to learning about all the new stuff added to JS in the last 10 years or so (or just stuff I did now know about back then) and would like to know whats the difference between

function xyz() // I used to always use it like this
{}

and this that I keep seeing:

xyz:function()
{}

It also has a funny little comma with two or more functions like so:

xyz1:function()
{},
xyz2:function()
{}
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2  
    
Thank you! Will have a look! –  Ryan Aug 18 '11 at 21:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

That's when you are creating an object with function inside it:

var functions = {

    xyz1:function(){},
    xyz2:function(){}

}

Now I can do:

functions.xyz1();
//or:
functions.xyz2();
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Thanks, that makes it a bit clearer! –  Ryan Aug 18 '11 at 21:52
xyz:function()
{}

alone is invaid syntax. The key: value notation, however, is used in objects.

For example,

var functions = {
    xyz: function()
         {}
}

Then you can call it like functions.xyz().

This is very popular these days with libraries like jQuery, where you are often working with objects which contain a set of functions.

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Thanks, that makes it a bit clearer! –  Ryan Aug 18 '11 at 21:52

Both are perfectly valid ways of defining a function.

The second function is an example of Javascript object notation, and it can be leveraged to make a more easy to understand Object orientated javascript 'class'.

See my answer to this question to see an example of this:

function in JSON format - possible?

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Thanks, will check it out –  Ryan Aug 18 '11 at 21:53

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