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I need to find customers who have made identical orders. (Using T-SQL)

Order

OrderID Customerer  
1   2   
2   5   
3   6   
4   2   
5   4   
6   6   
7   8

OrderLine

OrderLineID OrderID OrderDate   OrderType   Quantity    Reference  
1   1   01/01/2011  1   1   Coca Cola  
2   1   01/01/2011  1   3   Tea  
3   2   02/02/2011  2   1   Coffee  
4   2   02/02/2011  2   2   Solo  
5   2   03/02/2011  1   1   Soda  
6   3   03/02/2011  1   3   Tea  
7   3   03/02/2011  1   1   Coca Cola  
8   4   05/06/2011  1   1   Beer  
9   5   06/06/2011  2   1   Tea  
10  5   06/06/2011  2   1   Coca Cola  
11  6   07/07/2011  1   1   Coffee  
12  6   07/07/2011  1   2   Solo  
13  6   07/07/2011  1   1   Soda  
14  6   07/07/2011  1   1   Beer  
15  7   08/08/2011  1   1   Beer  

Here orders with OrderID 1 and 3 are considered to be identical because the number for orderlines, "Quantity" and "Reference" are identical on both orders. Meaning that customer 2 and 6 have placed identical orders.

Order 5 are not identical to order 1 and 3 because Quantity differ.

Order 2 are not identical to order 6 because orderlines differ.

Order 4 and 7 are also identical.

I am searching for a ressult like this:

IdenticalOrders

OrderID CustomeerID  
1   2  
3   6  
4   2  
7   8  

It seems like an easy task, but I just can't understand where to start. (I am still new to t-sql :-) )

share|improve this question
1  
The result as you sketch it gives you any order that is identical to any other order, but you won't know which is the matching order –  devio Aug 18 '11 at 21:54
1  
This is a variant of relational division. –  Martin Smith Aug 18 '11 at 22:26
    
I agree with devio. The resulting information is not very useful at all, especially if there are more than 2 matching orders. I've come up with a variation of Martin Smith's second option (which I think is brilliant). I will post it shortly. –  deutschZuid Aug 19 '11 at 0:09
    
I would also mention that since your business logic would presuppose that an identical order is impossible, then returning more than 1 matching invoice is a little overkill since there should only ever be one. –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT Aug 19 '11 at 0:38
    
Thanks all for your comments. Thank JohnD for editing my "messy" question :-) –  David Aug 19 '11 at 7:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is an extension of Martin's second suggestion. This will show all matching combinations without any repetitions.

;With FmtOL(customer, orderid, complete_order) as
(            
SELECT  customer, orderid, complete_order
     FROM    Order O
                    cross apply ( SELECT    CAST(Quantity AS VARCHAR(30))
                                            + '~' + Reference + '~~'
                                  FROM      OrderLine OL
                                  WHERE     OL.OrderID = O.OrderID
                                  ORDER BY  Reference ,
                                            Quantity
                                FOR
                                  XML PATH('')
                                ) T ( complete_order )
)
SELECT  T1.OrderId, 
        T1.Customer,
        STUFF(C1.a, 1, 2, '') as [SameAs]
FROM    FmtOL T1
Cross apply ( SELECT '; ' + 'Customer ' + Cast(T2.Customer as varchar(30)) 
                  + '''s order ' + Cast(T2.OrderID as varchar(30))
                 FROM   FmtOL T2
                 WHERE  T1.Customer < T2.Customer
                   AND T1.OrderId < T2.OrderId
                   AND T1.complete_order = T2.complete_order
                 order by ';' + Cast(T2.Customer as varchar(30)) 
                    + '''s order ' + Cast(T2.OrderID as varchar(30))
                    , t2.orderid
                 for xml path('')
             ) C1 (a)
  where C1.a is not null

Results should look like this:

OrderId Customer SameAs 
1       2        Customer 6's order 3 
4       2        Customer 8's order 7
share|improve this answer

Here's one way.

SELECT  O1.OrderID ,
        O1.Customer ,
        O2.OrderID ,
        O2.Customer
FROM    [Order] O1
        JOIN [Order] O2 ON O1.OrderID < O2.OrderID
                           AND O1.Customer <> O2.Customer
WHERE   NOT EXISTS ( SELECT Quantity ,
                            Reference
                     FROM   OrderLine
                     WHERE  O1.OrderID = OrderLine.OrderID
                     EXCEPT
                     SELECT Quantity ,
                            Reference
                     FROM   OrderLine
                     WHERE  O2.OrderID = OrderLine.OrderID )
        AND NOT EXISTS ( SELECT Quantity ,
                                Reference
                         FROM   OrderLine
                         WHERE  O2.OrderID = OrderLine.OrderID
                         EXCEPT
                         SELECT Quantity ,
                                Reference
                         FROM   OrderLine
                         WHERE  O1.OrderID = OrderLine.OrderID )

You can also use XML PATH to simulate GROUP_CONCAT then JOIN the two result sets

DECLARE @T TABLE
    (
      OrderId INT PRIMARY KEY,
      Customer INT ,
      complete_order VARCHAR(MAX)
    )  

    INSERT  INTO @T
            SELECT  *
            FROM    [Order] O
                    CROSS APPLY ( SELECT    CAST(Quantity AS VARCHAR(30))
                                            + '~' + Reference + '~~'
                                  FROM      OrderLine OL
                                  WHERE     OL.OrderID = O.OrderID
                                  ORDER BY  Reference ,
                                            Quantity
                                FOR
                                  XML PATH('')
                                ) T ( complete_order )

SELECT  T1.OrderId, 
        T1.Customer
FROM    @T T1
WHERE   EXISTS ( SELECT *
                 FROM   @T T2
                 WHERE  T1.Customer <> T2.Customer
                        AND T1.OrderId <> T2.OrderId
                        AND T1.complete_order = T2.complete_order )
share|improve this answer

Here's the most simple approach.

-- sample table
create table x
    (
         LineId int identity(1, 1)
        ,InvoiceFk int
        ,ProductFk int
        ,Quantity int
    )

-- sample data
insert into x 
(InvoiceFk, ProductFk, Quantity) values
     (11, 1, 1)
    ,(11, 2, 1)
    ,(11, 3, 1)
    ,(12, 1, 2)
    ,(12, 2, 2)
    ,(12, 3, 2)
    ,(13, 1, 3)
    ,(13, 2, 3)
    ,(13, 3, 3)

-- your order, probably from a parameter
declare @order table
    (
         InvoiceFk int
        ,ProductFk int
        ,Quantity int
    )
insert into @order
(InvoiceFk, ProductFk, Quantity) values
     (14, 1, 1) -- duplicate invoice 11
    ,(14, 2, 1)
    ,(14, 3, 1)

-- your order unique checksum
declare @orderCheck int
select @orderCheck = checksum_agg(checksum(ProductFk, Quantity))
from @order

-- test your order in existing data
declare @match int
select @match = 
    (
        select TOP 1 InvoiceFk from
        (
            select
                 InvoiceFk
                ,checksum_agg(Col1) as Col2
            from
                (
                select 
                     InvoiceFk
                    ,checksum(productfk, quantity) as Col1
                from x
                ) as T1
            group by
                InvoiceFk
        ) as T2
        where 
            T2.Col2 = @orderCheck
    )


-- evaluate if your order is unique or not
if (@match is not null)
begin
    print 'Identical to invoice: ' + Str(@match);
end
else
begin
    print 'Order is unique';
end

-- clean up sample table
drop table x    

Best of luck!

share|improve this answer
    
Result is Identical to invoice: 11 –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT Aug 19 '11 at 0:34
    
There is always an issue of performance to consider with any SQL activity. Because of your stated requirements, I recommend you use my code to generate the Invoice checksum and store that value in the Invoices table. This way you do not need to recalculate it every time you try to submit an order. All you need to do is a quick WHERE against Invoices.ItemsCheckSum column (which will be far more efficient). But that's just a recommendation; you are your own developer. My code works without such a column, too. –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT Aug 19 '11 at 0:35
    
Thanks :-) I'll look into this. I'll test both solutions. –  David Aug 19 '11 at 7:21
    
@David, don't forget to mark the right answer. –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT Aug 19 '11 at 15:38
    
I have finaly tested everything and vent with a @Jerry Nixon's answer. –  David Aug 24 '11 at 6:00

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