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Why does not this AES encryption work? I've written it in Java to test, but I am not able to decrypt. I get garbage upon decryption. Why? Its so simple - In the main method, print plain text, encrypt, print cipher text, decrypt, print plain text again. Am I doing something wrong? Please help me figure out the problem.

import javax.crypto.Cipher; import javax.crypto.spec.IvParameterSpec; import javax.crypto.spec.SecretKeySpec; public class AESTest { public static void main(String [] args) { try { String plainText = "Hello World!!!!!"; String encryptionKey = "E072EDF9534053A0B6C581C58FBF25CC"; System.out.println("Before encryption - " + plainText); String cipherText = encrypt(plainText, encryptionKey); System.out.println("After encryption - " + cipherText); String decrypted = decrypt(cipherText, encryptionKey); System.out.println("After decryption - " + decrypted); } catch (Exception e) { e.printStackTrace(); } } public static String encrypt(String plainText, String passkey) throws Exception { Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES/CBC/NoPadding", "SunJCE"); SecretKeySpec key = new SecretKeySpec(hexStringToByteArray(passkey), "AES"); cipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, key, new IvParameterSpec(new byte[cipher.getBlockSize()])); String cipherText = new String(cipher.doFinal(plainText.getBytes())); return cipherText; } public static String decrypt(String cipherText, String passkey) throws Exception{ Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES/CBC/NoPadding", "SunJCE"); SecretKeySpec key = new SecretKeySpec(hexStringToByteArray(passkey), "AES"); cipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, key, new IvParameterSpec(new byte[cipher.getBlockSize()])); String plainText = new String(cipher.doFinal(cipherText.getBytes())); return plainText; } public static byte[] hexStringToByteArray(String s) { int len = s.length(); byte[] data = new byte[len / 2]; for (int i = 0; i < len; i += 2) { data[i / 2] = (byte) ((Character.digit(s.charAt(i), 16) << 4) + Character.digit(s.charAt(i+1), 16)); } return data; } }
share|improve this question
    
Can you post your error as well. – Jim Aug 18 '11 at 22:00
    
@Jim No "error" -- apparently it just doesn't return the original "Hello World!!!!!" data. – user166390 Aug 18 '11 at 22:02
    
+1 for SSCCE... – MByD Aug 18 '11 at 22:02
    
Storing the encrypted data as a String is very problematic because not all byte sequences are valid Unicode [UTF-16]. It should just be kept around in byte[] -- also see Henning Makholm's and user802421's answers. – user166390 Aug 18 '11 at 22:07
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The output of the cipher is a sequence of random-looking bytes. You have no guarantee that these bytes will be a valid encoding for a character string in whatever is your system's default encoding. So this line:

 String cipherText = new String(cipher.doFinal(.....));

is likely to lose information that you'll need for decryption.

Therefore you will not get the right bytes reconstructed in your decrypt operation. For example, if your default encoding is UTF-8, it is overwhelmingly unlikely that the correct ciphertext is something that String.getBytes() is even able to produce.

share|improve this answer
    
"Hello world!!!!!" is surely just fine as both ASCII and UTF-8? The code posted is a particular test-case that is failing. – user166390 Aug 18 '11 at 22:04
3  
But the OP is using new String(...) on the encrypted bytes and attempting to reconstruct them with String.getBytes() in the decrypt operation. That has no right to work. – Henning Makholm Aug 18 '11 at 22:08
    
Agreed, however the wording in this post ... misses why it won't work. – user166390 Aug 18 '11 at 22:09
    
What do you think is unclear? – Henning Makholm Aug 18 '11 at 22:10
    
The part where it talks about UTF-8/8-bit character sets. It just confuses, IMOHO. I think if it talked about new String(byteArr) (assume a particular encoding, even though it's system-specific) only being valid where byteArr was generated from a string for said particular encoding not an array of random bytes, would sum it up. – user166390 Aug 18 '11 at 22:12

Two things:

No padding can only work if you use input that is an exact mulitple of your key size, which is 128 bit or 16 bytes. So in your particular case "Hello World!!!!!".getBytes() is actually a multiple of 16, but this is of course not true for arbitrary Strings.

Use "AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding" instead to solve this issue.

Do not turn your encrypted data into a String - this will and change the encrypted output. There's no guarantee that new String(byte[]).getBytes() returns the exact same byte array! So you should leave the encrypted data as what it is - a stream of bytes. Thus encrypt should return byte[] instead and decrypt should take byte[] as input - this is a working example:

public class NewClass {
    public static void main(String [] args) {
        try {
            String plainText = "Hello World!!!!";
            String encryptionKey = "E072EDF9534053A0B6C581C58FBF25CC";

            System.out.println("Before encryption - " + plainText);

            byte[] cipherText = encrypt(plainText, encryptionKey);

            System.out.println("After encryption - " + cipherText);

            String decrypted = decrypt(cipherText, encryptionKey);

            // -> Hello World!!!!
            System.out.println("After decryption - " + decrypted);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } 
    }

    public static byte[] encrypt(String plainText, String passkey) throws Exception {
        Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding", "SunJCE");
        SecretKeySpec key = new SecretKeySpec(hexStringToByteArray(passkey), "AES");
        cipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, key, new IvParameterSpec(new byte[cipher.getBlockSize()]));
        return cipher.doFinal(plainText.getBytes());
    }

    public static String decrypt(byte[] cipherText, String passkey) throws Exception{
        Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding", "SunJCE");
        SecretKeySpec key = new SecretKeySpec(hexStringToByteArray(passkey), "AES");
        cipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, key, new IvParameterSpec(new    byte[cipher.getBlockSize()]));
        return new String(cipher.doFinal(cipherText));
} 
share|improve this answer

You need to create the SecretKeySpec object once and use it for both encrypt and decrypt. Currently the code is creating two different keys for each operation and this will definitely lead to incorrect results.

share|improve this answer
    
But both the SecreyKeySpec objects are created from the same encryption key? Why should this matter? – user166390 Aug 18 '11 at 22:03
1  
That shouldn't matter, because the same bytes are used to construct both SecretKeySpecs. A symmetric cipher would not be worth much if the recipient of encrypted data could not construct a correct key object from hist knowledge of the key bytes. – Henning Makholm Aug 18 '11 at 22:04
    
You are correct. I was thinking that the SecretKeySpecs object wrapped the raw key bytes with a key wrapping algo. I got my work mixed up with this code sample. – uperez Aug 19 '11 at 0:31

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