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I have two linear fits that I've gotten from lm calls in my R script. For instance...

fit1 <- lm(y1 ~ x1)
fit2 <- lm(y2 ~ x2)

I'd like to find the (x,y) point at which these two lines (fit1 and fit2) intersect, if they intersect at all.

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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

One way to avoid the geometry is to re-parameterize the equations as:

y1 = m1 * (x1 - x0) + y0
y2 = m2 * (x2 - x0) + y0

in terms of their intersection point (x0, y0) and then perform the fit of both at once using nls so that the returned values of x0 and y0 give the result:

# test data
set.seed(123)
x1 <- 1:10
y1 <- -5 + x1 + rnorm(10)
x2 <- 1:10
y2 <- 5 - x1 + rnorm(10)
g <- rep(1:2, each = 10) # first 10 are from x1,y1 and second 10 are from x2,y2

xx <- c(x1, x2)
yy <- c(y1, y2)
nls(yy ~ ifelse(g == 1, m1 * (xx - x0) + y0, m2 * (xx - x0) + y0),
    start = c(m1 = -1, m2 = 1, y0 = 0, x0 = 0))

EDIT: Note that the lines xx<-... and yy<-... are new and the nls line has been specified in terms of those and corrected.

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this is perfect. is it possible for you to show me, using this code you already have, how I can specify that the following requirement: the solution (the two lines) must have an intersection point between z1 and z2 (two values I specify) –  CodeGuy Aug 19 '11 at 14:59
    
@CodeGuy, Specify the arguments: algorithm = "port", lower = ...whatever..., upper = ...whatever... as per ?nls. –  G. Grothendieck Aug 19 '11 at 15:59
    
I'm not familiar with what you mean. Can you add it to the code and show me? –  CodeGuy Aug 19 '11 at 16:27
    
@CodeGuy, Assuming you want to restrict x0 to lie between 2 and 4: nls(c(y1, y2) ~ ifelse(g == 1, b1 * (x1 - x0) + y0, b2 * (x2 - x0) + y0), start = c(b1 = -1, b2 = 1, y0 = 0, x0 = 3), algorithm = "port", lower = c(b1 = -Inf, b2 = -Inf, y0 = -Inf, x0 = 2), upper = c(b1 = Inf, b2 = Inf, y0 = Inf, x0 = 4)) –  G. Grothendieck Aug 19 '11 at 16:55
    
wait a sec. the input is just x and y values. I don't have two sets of (x,y) values. Just one set. –  CodeGuy Aug 19 '11 at 16:58
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If the regression coefficients in the two models are not equal (which is almost certain) then the lines would intersect. The coef function is used to extract them. The rest is high school geometry.

For Brandon: M^-1 %*% intercepts -->

M <- matrix( c(coef(m1)[2], coef(m2)[2], -1,-1), nrow=2, ncol=2 )
intercepts <- as.matrix( c(coef(m1)[1], coef(m2)[1]) )  # a column matrix
 -solve(M) %*% intercepts
#        [,1]
#[1,] 12.78597
#[2,] 16.34479
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sure it's geometry, but is there an easy R way to do it? that was my question. –  CodeGuy Aug 18 '11 at 22:29
1  
My point is that this is essentially off-topic for an R section. If you persist with basic math questions you will be inviting a bunch of votes to [close]. –  BondedDust Aug 18 '11 at 22:32
    
Interesting, I've never seen that %*% before. I'm not sure I understand what it's doing there. –  Brandon Bertelsen Aug 18 '11 at 23:10
    
Nevermind, I found it ?'%*%' gogo team linear algebra. –  Brandon Bertelsen Aug 18 '11 at 23:12
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Here's some high school geometry then ;-)

# First two models
df1 <- data.frame(x=1:50, y=1:50/2+rnorm(50)+10)
m1 <- lm(y~x, df1)

df2 <- data.frame(x=1:25, y=25:1*2+rnorm(25)-10)
m2 <- lm(y~x, df2)

# Plot them to show the intersection visually    
plot(df1)
points(df2)

# Now calculate it!    
a <- coef(m1)-coef(m2)
c(x=-a[[1]]/a[[2]], y=coef(m1)[[2]]*x + coef(m1)[[1]])

Or, to simplify the solve-based solution by @Dwin:

cm <- rbind(coef(m1),coef(m2)) # Coefficient matrix
c(-solve(cbind(cm[,2],-1)) %*% cm[,1])
# [1] 12.68034 16.57181 
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+1 for taking the OP back to school. –  Brandon Bertelsen Aug 18 '11 at 22:51
1  
Or just use solve. Although maybe that's more of a college solution? ;) –  joran Aug 18 '11 at 22:51
    
lol, I could have done the high school geometry. just wanted to see if there was a better way!! –  CodeGuy Aug 18 '11 at 22:55
    
Can you show a solution using solve? I'd be interested to see it. I don't use it very frequently. –  Brandon Bertelsen Aug 18 '11 at 22:58
    
@Brandon I'll post on in an edit to my answer. –  BondedDust Aug 18 '11 at 23:05
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