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I am trying to write a shell script that creates some directories on a remote server and then uses scp to copy files from my local machine onto the remote. Here's what I have so far:

ssh -t user@server<<EOT
DEP_ROOT='/home/matthewr/releases'
datestamp=$(date +%Y%m%d%H%M%S)
REL_DIR=$DEP_ROOT"/"$datestamp
if [ ! -d "$DEP_ROOT" ]; then
    echo "creating the root directory"
    mkdir $DEP_ROOT
fi
mkdir $REL_DIR
exit
EOT

scp ./dir1 user@server:$REL_DIR
scp ./dir2 user@server:$REL_DIR

Whenever I run it I get this message:

Pseudo-terminal will not be allocated because stdin is not a terminal.

And the script just hangs forever.

My public key is trusted on the server and I can run all the commands outside of the script just fine. Any ideas?

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Why not use rsync? – sean_m Oct 31 '13 at 19:02
up vote 200 down vote accepted

Try ssh -t -t to force pseudo-tty allocation even if stdin isn't a terminal.

See also: Terminating SSH session executed by bash script

share|improve this answer
19  
@Matthew, multiple -t is different than one -t. See the manual. – Cheng Nov 12 '11 at 14:06
14  
I am having a similar issue in a script that is run here. I added the -t -t but now I am getting a new error. "tcgetattr: Inappropriate ioctl for device" – MasterZ Dec 18 '12 at 19:32
1  
Brilliant! Who would have guessed at using multiple -t options! I was trying to ssh from a Windows EC2 image I had remoted into and was getting no where. Thanks! – Brian Tarbox Nov 22 '13 at 21:19
4  
Why ssh -t -t and not ssh -tt? Is there a difference that I'm not aware of? – Jack Jul 24 '14 at 21:27
2  
@MasterZ Same thing here. It would be nice to get an answer to this Inappropriate IOCtl for device – krb686 Mar 3 '15 at 20:26

Also with option -T from manual

Disable pseudo-tty allocation

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3  
This answer needs more points - its the right answer, and not too long like the answer by zanco, its absurd that "oh allocate a TTY anyway with -t -t" gets 107 points, when you can just skip it altogether – nhed Jun 7 '14 at 0:05
1  
Yeah people need to use SO as one source of information, sanity tested by referring to the man pages and other documentation. – Paul McNett Jun 12 '14 at 18:10
2  
Just upvoted; it did worked better for me than -t -t – Vincent Hiribarren Jun 19 '14 at 13:44
7  
'-t -t' works, however with '-T' i get 'sudo: sorry, you must have a tty to run sudo' – Ivan Balashov Aug 14 '14 at 21:39
    
Worked for me as well! – игор Nov 15 '15 at 9:59

I'm adding this answer because it solved a related problem that I was having with the same error message.

Problem: I had installed cygwin under Windows and was getting this error: Pseudo-terminal will not be allocated because stdin is not a terminal

Resolution: It turns out that I had not installed the openssh client program and utilities. Because of that cygwin was using the Windows implementation of ssh, not the cygwin version. The solution was to install the openssh cygwin package.

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4  
For me it turned out it was another ssh implementiation in the PATH: $ which ssh/cygdrive/c/Program Files (x86)/Git/bin/ssh – FelixJongleur42 Dec 16 '14 at 8:48

Here's the "correct" (syntactic) way to execute something like this in bash:

ssh user@server "$( cat <<'EOT'
echo "These commands will be run on: $( uname -a )"
EOT
)"

Per zanco's answer, you're not providing a remote command to ssh, given how the shell parses the command line.

The solution above fixes this problem in the following manner:

  1. ssh user@server is parsed by bash, and is interpreted to be the ssh command, followed by an argument user@server to be passed to the ssh command

  2. " begins an interpolated string, which when completed, will comprise an argument to be passed to the ssh command, which in this case will be interpreted by ssh to be the remote command to execute as user@server

  3. $( begins a command to be executed, with the output being captured by the surrounding interpolated string

  4. cat is a command to output the contents of whatever file follows. The output of cat will be passed back into the capturing interpolated string

  5. << begins a bash heredoc

  6. 'EOT' specifies that the name of the heredoc is EOT. The single quotes ' surrounding EOT specifies that the heredoc should be parsed as a nowdoc, which is a special form of heredoc in which the contents do not get interpolated by bash, but rather passed on in literal format

  7. Any content that is encountered between <<'EOT' and <newline>EOT<newline> will be appended to the nowdoc output

  8. EOT terminates the nowdoc, resulting in a nowdoc temporary file being created and passed back to the calling cat command. cat outputs the nowdoc and passes the output back to the capturing interpolated string

  9. ) concludes the command to be executed

  10. " concludes the capturing interpolated string. The contents of the interpolated string will be passed back to ssh as a single command line argument, which ssh will interpret as the remote command to execute as user@server

UPDATE: If you need to avoid using external tools like cat, and don't mind having two statements instead of one, use the read built-in with a here-doc to generate the SSH command:

IFS='' read -r -d '' SSH_COMMAND <<'EOT'
echo "These commands will be run on: $( uname -a )"
echo "They are executed by: $( whoami )"
EOT

ssh user@server "${SSH_COMMAND}"
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1  
+1 a year later! This helped me on a script I'm working on. – bedwyr Feb 26 '14 at 22:50
    
+1 one and a half years later! :) really clear explanation. well done – yaroslavTir Sep 11 '14 at 12:45
    
beauty, thanks! – chaosless Jan 31 '15 at 23:50
    
For me (and I'm by no means a "DevOps" person) this is what worked (I'm using Jenkins). I also tried the "-t -t" and "-T" suggestions, but ran into open stream issues and non-execution issues. – Ryan Crews Sep 15 '15 at 21:57

I don't know where the hang comes from, but redirecting (or piping) commands into an interactive ssh is in general a recipe for problems. It is more robust to use the command-to-run-as-a-last-argument style and pass the script on the ssh command line:

ssh user@server 'DEP_ROOT="/home/matthewr/releases"
datestamp=$(date +%Y%m%d%H%M%S)
REL_DIR=$DEP_ROOT"/"$datestamp
if [ ! -d "$DEP_ROOT" ]; then
    echo "creating the root directory"
    mkdir $DEP_ROOT
fi
mkdir $REL_DIR'

(All in one giant '-delimited multiline command-line argument).

The pseudo-terminal message is because of your -t which asks ssh to try to make the environment it runs on the remote machine look like an actual terminal to the programs that run there. Your ssh client is refusing to do that because its own standard input is not a terminal, so it has no way to pass the special terminal APIs onwards from the remote machine to your actual terminal at the local end.

What were you trying to achieve with -t anyway?

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The -t option was an attempt to fix the Psuedo terminal problem (it didn't work). I tried your solution, it got rid of the psuedo terminal thing but now it just hangs... – Matthew Aug 18 '11 at 23:00
3  
@Henning: Can you please elaborate or provide a link regarding the disadvantages of redirecting or piping into an interactive ssh? – Isaac Kleinman Dec 4 '12 at 18:45

The warning message Pseudo-terminal will not be allocated because stdin is not a terminal. is due to the fact that no command is specified for ssh while stdin is redirected from a here document. Due to the lack of a specified command as an argument ssh first expects an interactive login session (which would require the allocation of a pty on the remote host) but then has to realize that its local stdin is no tty/pty. Redirecting ssh's stdin from a here document normally requires a command (such as /bin/sh) to be specified as an argument to ssh - and in such a case no pty will be allocated on the remote host by default.

Since there are no commands to be executed via ssh that require the presence of a tty/pty (such as vim or top) the -t switch to ssh is superfluous. Just use ssh -T user@server <<EOT ... or ssh user@server /bin/bash <<EOT ... and the warning will go away.

If <<EOF is not escaped or single-quoted (i. e. <<\EOT or <<'EOT') variables inside the here document will be expanded by the local shell before it is executing ssh .... The effect is that the variables inside the here document will remain empty because they are defined only in the remote shell.

So, if $REL_DIR should be both accessible by the local shell and defined in the remote shell, $REL_DIR has to be defined outside the here document before the ssh command (version 1 below); or, if <<\EOT or <<'EOT' is used, the output of the ssh command can be assigned to REL_DIR if the only output of the ssh command to stdout is genererated by echo "$REL_DIR" inside the escaped/single-quoted here document (version 2 below).

A third option would be to store the here document in a variable and then pass this variable as a command argument to ssh -t user@server "$heredoc" (version 3 below).

And, last but not least, it would be no bad idea to check if the directories on the remote host were created successfully (see: check if file exists on remote host with ssh).

# version 1

unset DEP_ROOT REL_DIR
DEP_ROOT='/tmp'
datestamp=$(date +%Y%m%d%H%M%S)
REL_DIR="${DEP_ROOT}/${datestamp}"

ssh localhost /bin/bash <<EOF
if [ ! -d "$DEP_ROOT" ] && [ ! -e "$DEP_ROOT" ]; then
   echo "creating the root directory" 1>&2
   mkdir "$DEP_ROOT"
fi
mkdir "$REL_DIR"
#echo "$REL_DIR"
exit
EOF

scp -r ./dir1 user@server:"$REL_DIR"
scp -r ./dir2 user@server:"$REL_DIR"


# version 2

REL_DIR="$(
ssh localhost /bin/bash <<\EOF
DEP_ROOT='/tmp'
datestamp=$(date +%Y%m%d%H%M%S)
REL_DIR="${DEP_ROOT}/${datestamp}"
if [ ! -d "$DEP_ROOT" ] && [ ! -e "$DEP_ROOT" ]; then
   echo "creating the root directory" 1>&2
   mkdir "$DEP_ROOT"
fi
mkdir "$REL_DIR"
echo "$REL_DIR"
exit
EOF
)"

scp -r ./dir1 user@server:"$REL_DIR"
scp -r ./dir2 user@server:"$REL_DIR"


# version 3

heredoc="$(cat <<'EOF'
# -onlcr: prevent the terminal from converting bare line feeds to carriage return/line feed pairs
stty -echo -onlcr
DEP_ROOT='/tmp'
datestamp="$(date +%Y%m%d%H%M%S)"
REL_DIR="${DEP_ROOT}/${datestamp}"
if [ ! -d "$DEP_ROOT" ] && [ ! -e "$DEP_ROOT" ]; then
   echo "creating the root directory" 1>&2
   mkdir "$DEP_ROOT"
fi
mkdir "$REL_DIR"
echo "$REL_DIR"
stty echo onlcr
exit
EOF
)"

REL_DIR="$(ssh -t localhost "$heredoc")"

scp -r ./dir1 user@server:"$REL_DIR"
scp -r ./dir2 user@server:"$REL_DIR"
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the very detailed explanation on what this error means and why it is appearing when using a heredoc, this helped me to actually understand it rather than just work around it. – Dan Feb 13 '15 at 16:55

I had the same issue in cygwin. Installing openssh into cygwin solves the problem best. Running on Windows ssh -t -t prints current command (before stdout) which I don't like.

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ssh -t foobar@localhost yourscript.pl

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I was having the same error under Windows using emacs 24.5.1 to connect to some company servers through /ssh:user@host. What solved my problem was setting the "tramp-default-method" variable to "plink" and whenever I connect to a server I ommit the ssh protocol. You need to have PuTTY's plink.exe installed for this to work.

Solution

  1. M-x customize-variable (and then hit Enter)
  2. tramp-default-method (and then hit Enter again)
  3. On the text field put plink and then Apply and Save the buffer
  4. Whenever I try to access a remote server I now use C-x-f /user@host: and then input the password. The connection is now correctly made under Emacs on Windows to my remote server.
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