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I'd like to avoid the repetitious code-bloat and typing tedium of defining "C-struct-like" classes like:

class Foo {
    int x;
    float y;
    String z;
    public Foo(int x, float y, String z) {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
        this.z = z;
    }
}

? E.g. are there any Eclipse tricks that may be helpful here?

To see what I mean by "code-bloat", compare the above with what it takes to define the corresponding struct in C:

struct foo {
    int x;
    float y;
    char *z;
}

Each member field is mentioned only once, whereas in the Java code it needs to be mentioned three times (one of them in the form of the corresponding constructor argument).

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3  
Yeah, but in C you don't get to hide those members. The price of encapsulation is occasionally verbosity. (And if you don't want to hide them then you don't need the verbosity even in Java.) –  dlev Aug 18 '11 at 22:57
1  
If your fields are public or package-private, and non final, do you really need a constructor that sets them? You can set them after the instantiation of Foo. –  Laurent Pireyn Aug 18 '11 at 23:01
    
Also, the C++ code does not generate a constructor. –  Janick Bernet Aug 18 '11 at 23:01
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In eclipse you can right click in java editor, source -> generate constructors using fields. I guess that is what you are looking for.

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thanks dlev for correcting my 'text lingo' from wat -> what. I will take care of it! –  cheekoo Aug 18 '11 at 23:07
1  
Yea this is the way to go. With this shortcut, you just type the three lines like you want and eclipse handles the rest. There is also a keyboard shortcut to get to it: Alt + Shift + S, O –  hbtest Aug 18 '11 at 23:09
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Eclipse has a "Generate Constructor using Fields..." in the Source menu.

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You can do that in Java as well, but it is against the basic OOP principles:

class Foo {
    public int x;
    public float y;
    public String z;
}

some other class:

Foo foo = new Foo();
foo.x = 1;
// etc..

Just like Cs struct:

struct Foo {
   int x;
   float y;
   char *z;
};

struct Foo foo;
foo.x = 1;
// etc...
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No way around that in Java, unfortunately, if you want to initialize those values in the constructor. Scala has a solution for it if you're open to another JVM language...

EDIT: You could just make all your fields public tho. In theory, this is a bad idea. In practice, sometimes it's the right solution.

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