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I am reading Thinking In Java at the moment and I encountered one small problem. I am doing exercise 12 from chapter 8.

Create an interface with at least one method, in its own package. Create a class in a >separate package. Add a protected inner class that implements the interface. In a third >package, inherit from your class and, inside a method, return an object of the protected >inner class, upcasting to the interface during the return.

So I created these .java files:

A.java

    package c08;
    public interface A
    {
        void one();
    }

Pr2.java

    package c082;
    import c08.*;
    public class Pr2 
    {
        protected class InPr2 implements A
        {
           public void one() {System.out.println("Pr2.InPr2.one");}
           protected InPr2() {}
        }
    }

Ex.java

    package c083;
    import c082.*;
    import c08.*;
    class Cl extends Pr2
    {
        A foo() 
        {
            InPr2 bar=new InPr2();
            return bar;
        } 
    }

And my NetBeans IDE underlines

    InPr2();

and says that:InPr2() has protected access in C082.Pr2.InPr2 and I am wondering why. If I didn't explicitly state that constructor in InPr2 should be protected it would be only accessible in C082 package, but when I am inheriting class Pr2 shoudn't it be available in class Cl, because InPr2 is protected? Everything is fine when I change constructor to public.

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2  
possible duplicate of Can't access protected inner class while inheriting –  Kal Aug 18 '11 at 23:13
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6 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It should work just fine as you have it, except changing the protected InPr2() {} to public InPr2() { }. In other words "Anyone can instantiate this class IF they can see the class to begin with."

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That is true, but in excersise it says that I should make this inner class as protected, and I was wondering why after inheriting and making constructor protected it is not working. –  Andrew Aug 18 '11 at 23:17
    
Because access to the class is scoped to 'those with protected access to Pr2'. This includes C1 because it extends Pr2. The constructor inside InPr2 however is available only to those with protected access to InPr2`, which at this point is only InPr2 and Pr2. Does this make sense? The access to use the class and use the constructor are scoped differently. –  corsiKa Aug 18 '11 at 23:20
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The constructor of InPr2 is protected, meaning that only classes inheriting from InPr2 (not Pr2) can call it. Classes that inherit from Pr2 can see the class Pr2, but they can't call its protected members, like the protected constructor.

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Makes sense, I was just under the impression that if I inherited Pr2 I should automatically get access to protected class. –  Andrew Aug 18 '11 at 23:19
    
@Andrew: Yes, so I believe that C1 should be able to see the class InPr2, since InPr2 is a protected member of Pr2. The constructor, however, is not a member of Pr2. –  RustyTheBoyRobot Aug 18 '11 at 23:24
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Even though the class InPr2 is accessible in Cl, its constructor is not. A protected constructor is accessible only to subclasses and classes in the same package.

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Change:

Pr2.java

package c082;
import c08.*;
public class Pr2 
{
    protected class InPr2 implements A
    {
       public void one() {System.out.println("Pr2.InPr2.one");}
       // This constructor was available only
       // to a class inheriting form Pr2.InPr2 - protected InPr2() {}
       public InPr2() {}
    }
}

The constructor fromPr2.InPr2 was just available to a class if it extended Pr2.InPr2.

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Protected member variables, methods and constructors are not accessible outside the package unless they are inherited. When we try to create an object of InPr2 the compiler will show error as the protected constructor is not accessible outside the package. The creation of an object depends on the access modifier of the Constructor too.

You can do one thing: InPr2 can be inherited inside class C.

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no class in java can be protected.

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Can you explain your answer a bit..? –  NREZ Aug 7 '13 at 12:28
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