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For example, our application tracks animal movements and prices for a farm. To get the current stock count the simplest solution is to have a starting number, then add up all the movement in and out until we have a current number. But this is memory intensive and gets slower and slower as the number of movements grows year after year.

We don't have the luxury of "freezing" a year so it can no longer accept changes, the system must be able to handle changes to movements at any point in time, then show the updated numbers in real time.

This is not just stock numbers; we have to track a large number of variables like this and write reports for each period (day, week, month, year) that include summary calculations based on these variables.

What is the most common, preferred, "best", fastest, elegant way to handle data streams that cross multiple years for calculation and reporting purposes? How would the database design and the architecture relate in this scenario (i.e. would using an ORM be fine as long as the database schema was well designed?). The critical requirements here are optimal performance and real-time availability.

I have seen in large scale systems thus kind of work is split up into time slices, e.g. week, month, year aggregate tables. I am particularly interested if there is a common design pattern for solving this problem.

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"To get the current stock count the simplest solution is to have a starting number, then add up all the movement in and out until we have a current number. But this is memory intensive and gets slower and slower as the number of movements grows year after year." Can't you just calculate the count to a given point in time (say annually) ,save that, and then you only need to add the recent changes - not the entire history? –  Adrian K Aug 19 '11 at 1:18
    
Yes I can do this. But then if the figures that make up "annually" change, they need recalculated. So my question is related to whether I aggregate into week, months (aggregate of weeks), years (aggregate of months) and then if I change a certain week I just update the affected slices (the associated week, month and year aggregates) without needing to recalculate other months or years. –  DaveO Aug 20 '11 at 4:05
    
I think I was assuming that for previous years there would be no change to the historical data, where-as the current year / months would change - but that overall amount of data for a year wouldn't be horrendous. –  Adrian K Aug 23 '11 at 0:52

3 Answers 3

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I would aggregate in the DB, as that's usually something they are very good at.

Have a look at OLAP (vs OLTP) database design.

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I'd go with an SQL database (PostgreSQL). RDBMS are quite fast with these things :)

Pulling all the history as ORM objects and then summing it the application might not work in the long run. You'll have to go with SQL queries that do most of the statistics work inside the RDBMS. You can off course still use ORM for displaying and editing objects though.

I think the solution should be quite safe with expected amount of data and RDBMS can be made to scale with proper indexing and more memory.

You can also make crazy amounts of random data and test scalability beforehand.

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jkj is right as long as the number of records is in the millions and doesn't cross into the territory of billions. When it does, you'll find that summaries take forever. "Crazy amounts of data" is a problematic term - crazy is in the eyes of the beholder. So, if you're dealing with real crazy amounts here lmk and I'll explain further. –  Elad Aug 19 '11 at 7:57
    
Yes, my question is related to database design and also ORM. I.e. do the aggregate in the database and pull up aggregated data into the ORM layer. –  DaveO Aug 20 '11 at 4:06

There is probably only one general approach - split the work.

You can split it in time and compute the aggregates periodically during some period with low load and store them in separate tables. For some aggregation functions you can even compute the long-period aggregates from the short-period ones without loose of precision.

You can split it also in space - there are solutions using combination of distributed database and map-reduce engine - look at Apache Pig for example. This approach would need a lot of learning and unlearning but you should get better scalability.

First thing you should know is your read:write ratio and the kind of queries you'd like to run.

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please do not abuse bold. Makes the text harder to read. –  jgauffin Aug 19 '11 at 15:13
    
Currently I'm leaning toward splitting in time, having week, month, year aggregate tables and each data change just updates the affected slice. –  DaveO Aug 20 '11 at 4:09

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