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I would like to give a 20% off discount on the cost of that class to member who has taken a class in the last quarter(If a member takes classes on three consecutive quarters, and she would be given discounts on her last two quarters). And sum up all discount($) I gave out.

Here are tables in the database:

ENROLLMENT (class_id, member_id, cost)

CLASS (class_id, season, year) and attribute season may be Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter.

And data would look like this:

Enrollment

Class_id  Member_id  Cost
--------  ---------  ----
3         3          20 
1         9          15 
2         9          20 
4         10         30 
3         10         10 
5         5          10 
4         9          30 
...

Class

class_id  Season  Year 
--------  ------  ----
1         Spring  2008 
2         Fall    2008 
3         Spring  2009 
4         Winter  2008 
5         Summer  2008 
...
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You have tags for [oracle] and [mysql]. Do you want solutions for both or either database? Or are you just including [oracle] because ORCL corporation now owns MySQL product? –  APC Aug 19 '11 at 11:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First of all, your data model is making it hard for you. You need an easy way to spot consecutive quarters, So, you need a table to hold that information, with a key which is a rising increment: how else do you expect the computer to know that Spring 2009 follows Winter 2008?

Anyway, here's my version of your test data. I'm using names to make it easier to see what's going on:

SQL> select s.name as student
  2         , c.name as class
  3         , q.season||' '||q.year as quarter
  4         , q.q_id
  5         , c.base_cost
  6  from  enrolments e
  7          join students s
  8              on (s.s_id = e.s_id)
  9          join classes c
 10              on (c.c_id = e.c_id)
 11          join quarters q
 12              on (q.q_id = c.q_id)
 13  order by s.s_id, q.q_id
 14  /

STUDENT    CLASS                QUARTER               Q_ID  BASE_COST
---------- -------------------- --------------- ---------- ----------
Sheldon    Introduction to SQL  Spring 2008            100        100
Sheldon    Advanced SQL         Spring 2009            104        150
Howard     Introduction to SQL  Spring 2008            100        100
Howard     Information Theory   Summer 2008            101         75
Rajesh     Information Theory   Summer 2008            101         75
Leonard    Crypto Foundation    Autumn 2008            102        120
Leonard    PHP for Dummies      Winter 2008            103         90
Leonard    Advanced SQL         Spring 2009            104        150

8 rows selected.

SQL>

As you can see, I have got a table QUARTERS whose primary key Q_ID increments by one in calendrical order.

I'm going to use Oracle syntax to solve this, specifically the LAG analytic function:

SQL> select s.name as student
  2         , c.name as class
  3         , q.season||' '||q.year as quarter
  4         , q.q_id
  5         , c.base_cost
  6         , lag (q.q_id) over (partition by s.s_id order by q.q_id) prev_q_id
  7  from  enrolments e
  8          join students s
  9              on (s.s_id = e.s_id)
 10          join classes c
 11              on (c.c_id = e.c_id)
 12          join quarters q
 13              on (q.q_id = c.q_id)
 14  order by s.s_id, q.q_id
 15  /

STUDENT    CLASS                QUARTER               Q_ID  BASE_COST  PREV_Q_ID
---------- -------------------- --------------- ---------- ---------- ----------
Sheldon    Introduction to SQL  Spring 2008            100        100
Sheldon    Advanced SQL         Spring 2009            104        150        100
Howard     Introduction to SQL  Spring 2008            100        100
Howard     Information Theory   Summer 2008            101         75        100
Rajesh     Information Theory   Summer 2008            101         75
Leonard    Crypto Foundation    Autumn 2008            102        120
Leonard    PHP for Dummies      Winter 2008            103         90        102
Leonard    Advanced SQL         Spring 2009            104        150        103

8 rows selected.

SQL>

So, by looking in the PREV_Q_ID columns we can see that Howard, Sheldon and Leonard have each taken more than one course. Only Leonard has taken three courses. By comparing the values in the PREV_Q_ID and Q_ID columns we can see that Howard's two courses are in consective quarters, whereas Sheldon's are not.

Now we can do some maths:

SQL> select student
  2          , class
  3          , quarter
  4          , base_cost
  5          , discount*100 as discount_pct
  6          , base_cost - (base_cost*discount) as actual_cost
  7  from
  8          ( select student
  9                  , class
 10                  , quarter
 11                  , base_cost
 12                  , case
 13                      when prev_q_id is not null
 14                           and q_id - prev_q_id = 1
 15                      then 0.2
 16                      else 0
 17                    end       as discount
 18                 , s_id
 19                 , q_id
 20            from
 21                  (
 22                  select s.name as student
 23                         , c.name as class
 24                         , q.season||' '||q.year as quarter
 25                         , q.q_id
 26                         , c.base_cost
 27                         , lag (q.q_id) over (partition by s.s_id order by q.q_id) prev_q_id
 28                         , s.s_id
 29                  from  enrolments e
 30                          join students s
 31                              on (s.s_id = e.s_id)
 32                          join classes c
 33                              on (c.c_id = e.c_id)
 34                          join quarters q
 35                              on (q.q_id = c.q_id)
 36                  )
 37          )
 38  order by s_id, q_id
 39  /

(artifical break to obviate the need to scroll down to see the results)

STUDENT    CLASS                QUARTER      BASE_COST DISCOUNT_PCT ACTUAL_COST
---------- -------------------- ----------- ---------- ------------ -----------
Sheldon    Introduction to SQL  Spring 2008        100            0         100
Sheldon    Advanced SQL         Spring 2009        150            0         150
Howard     Introduction to SQL  Spring 2008        100            0         100
Howard     Information Theory   Summer 2008         75           20          60
Rajesh     Information Theory   Summer 2008         75            0          75
Leonard    Crypto Foundation    Autumn 2008        120            0         120
Leonard    PHP for Dummies      Winter 2008         90           20          72
Leonard    Advanced SQL         Spring 2009        150           20         120

8 rows selected.

SQL>

So, Howard and Leonard get discounts for their consecutive classes, and Sheldon and Raj don't.

share|improve this answer

As your quarters are done in months, there's no easy trick to find the 'last two', so I'm going to assume that they are specified in the query.

Something like this should work:

SET @q0_season = 'Fall';
SET @q0_year = 2011;
SET @q1_season = 'Summer';
SET @q1_year = 2011;
SET @q2_season = 'Spring';
SET @q2_year = 2011;


SELECT DISTINCT e.class_id, e.member_id, e.cost, if (max(e1.member_id) is null, 0, 0.20) * if(max(e2.member_id) is null, 1, 2) discount
FROM enrollment e
INNER JOIN class c 
    ON c.class_id = e.class_id 
    AND c.season = @q0_season AND c.year = @q0_year
LEFT JOIN (enrollment e1 
    INNER JOIN class c1 ON c1.class_id = e1.class_id
        AND c1.season = @q1_season AND c1.year = @q1_year)
    ON e1.member_id = e.member_id
LEFT JOIN (enrollment e2
    INNER JOIN class c2 ON c2.class_id = e2.class_id
        AND c2.season = @q2_season AND c2.year = @q2_year)
    ON e2.member_id = e.member_id
GROUP BY e.class_id, e.member_id, e.cost;
share|improve this answer

Try to this one

select member_id, cost*0.8 as cost_discount, cost
from Enrollment e inner join
(select member_id, 
    group_concat(season ORDER BY season SEPARATOR ',') as group_season, year as year1 
    from class as c inner join ENROLLMENT as e on (c.class_id=e.class_id) group by Member_id, year
    having group_season='winter,spring,summer' or group_season='spring,summer,fall'
     or LOCATE('fall',group_season) <> 0 
) as t
on t.member_id=e.member_id inner join class as c on (c.class_id=e.class_id)
where year1='2011' and locate(season, substr(group_season, 7))

Unfortunately I didn't check this one on syntax error. Sum of discount:

select sum(cost - cost_discount) from (first_query);
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Suggestion: use a calendar table.

It would have one row for every day you will ever need (past and future dates), which should only amount to tens of thousands of rows (can always add more in the future ;)

Each row could have the following attributes (columns):

effective_date
current_quarter_season
current_quarter_year
prior_quarter_season
prior_quarter_year
next_prior_quarter_season
next_prior_quarter_year

Perhaps you can come up with better names :)

Sure, it's denormalized but this is an auxiliary 'helper' table so update anomalies shouldn't be an issue. You would then create joins using these attributes, rather than calculate the prior and next prior seasons and their years on the fly.

The idea is that SQL is a declarative language that works best with declarative solutions such as a calendar table.

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