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I'm having trouble understanding __file__. From what I understand, __file__ returns the absolute path from which the module was loaded.

I'm having problem producing this: I have a abc.py with one statement print __file__, running from /d/projects/ python abc.py returns abc.py. running from /d/ returns projects/abc.py. Any reasons why?

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8  
Here's what Guido has to say about this: mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2010-February/097461.html – kindall Aug 19 '11 at 4:22
up vote 61 down vote accepted

__file__ is the pathname of the file from which the module was loaded, if it was loaded from a file. The __file__ attribute is not present for C modules that are statically linked into the interpreter; for extension modules loaded dynamically from a shared library, it is the pathname of the shared library file.

From the mailing list thread linked by @kindall in a comment to the question:

I haven't tried to repro this particular example, but the reason is that we don't want to have to call getpwd() on every import nor do we want to have some kind of in-process variable to cache the current directory. (getpwd() is relatively slow and can sometimes fail outright, and trying to cache it has a certain risk of being wrong.)

What we do instead, is code in site.py that walks over the elements of sys.path and turns them into absolute paths. However this code runs before '' is inserted in the front of sys.path, so that the initial value of sys.path is ''.

For the rest of this, consider sys.path not to include ''.

So, if you aren't inside the part of sys.path that contains the module, you'll get an absolute path. If you are inside the part of sys.path that contains the module, you'll get a relative path.

If you load a module in the current directory, and the current directory isn't in sys.path, you'll get an absolute path.

If you load a module in the current directory, and the current directory is in sys.path, you'll get a relative path.

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so does it means that if there is a path from '' to the module, a relative path would be used, if not an absolute path would be used since the remainder of sys.path are absolute.. – goh Aug 19 '11 at 4:32
4  
If you load a module in the current directory, and the current directory isn't in sys.path, you'll get an absolute path. If you load a module in the current directory, and the current directory is in sys.path, you'll get a relative path. – agf Aug 19 '11 at 4:33
    
Remember, for this purpose, sys.path doesn't include ''. – agf Aug 19 '11 at 4:35
    
got it, but @agf, if i use python /foo/abc.py from /home, I suppose the part of sys.path that contains the module is /home/foo and my current directory is /home/, why does print file gives me a relative path? – goh Aug 19 '11 at 9:32

__file__ is always absolute since Python 3.4. Not sure if it resolves symlinks though.

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Thanks. This is a hard fact to track down! – meawoppl Nov 21 '14 at 18:56
2  
This is not true for Python 3.4.0 (Python 3.4.0 (default, Apr 11 2014, 13:05:11) [GCC 4.8.2] on linux). And symlinks are not resolved in my trials. – Frozen Flame Jan 2 '15 at 6:41
    
@FrozenFlame, feel free to report to bugs.python.org if 3.4.1 doesn't fix it. – anatoly techtonik Jan 3 '15 at 13:29
1  
Is os.path.realpath(__file__) the correct way to resolve symbolic links? – kevinarpe Mar 2 '15 at 9:13
2  
@kevinarpe, stackoverflow.com/questions/3220755/… – anatoly techtonik Mar 5 '15 at 8:53

Late simple example:

from os import path, getcwd, chdir

def print_my_path():
    print('cwd:     {}'.format(getcwd()))
    print('__file__:{}'.format(__file__))
    print('abspath: {}'.format(path.abspath(__file__)))

print_my_path()

chdir('..')

print_my_path()

Under Python-2.*, the second call incorrectly determines the path.abspath(__file__) based on the current directory:

cwd:     C:\codes\py
__file__:cwd_mayhem.py
abspath: C:\codes\py\cwd_mayhem.py
cwd:     C:\codes
__file__:cwd_mayhem.py
abspath: C:\codes\cwd_mayhem.py

As noted by @techtonik, in Python 3.4+, this will work fine since __file__ returns an absolute path.

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With the help of the of Guido mail provided by @kindall, we can understand the standard import process as trying to find the module in each member of sys.path, and file as the result of this lookup (more details in PyMOTW Modules and Imports.). So if the module is located in an absolute path in sys.path the result is absolute, but if it is located in a relative path in sys.path the result is relative.

Now the site.py startup file takes care of delivering only absolute path in sys.path, except the initial '', so if you don't change it by other means than setting the PYTHONPATH (whose path are also made absolute, before prefixing sys.path), you will get always an absolute path, but when the module is accessed through the current directory.

Now if you trick sys.path in a funny way you can get anything.

As example if you have a sample module foo.py in /tmp/ with the code:

import sys
print(sys.path)
print (__file__)

If you go in /tmp you get:

>>> import foo
['', '/tmp', '/usr/lib/python3.3', ...]
./foo.py

When in in /home/user, if you add /tmp your PYTHONPATH you get:

>>> import foo
['', '/tmp', '/usr/lib/python3.3', ...]
/tmp/foo.py

Even if you add ../../tmp, it will be normalized and the result is the same.

But if instead of using PYTHONPATH you use directly some funny path you get a result as funny as the cause.

>>> import sys
>>> sys.path.append('../../tmp')
>>> import foo
['', '/usr/lib/python3.3', .... , '../../tmp']
../../tmp/foo.py

Guido explains in the above cited thread, why python do not try to transform all entries in absolute paths:

we don't want to have to call getpwd() on every import .... getpwd() is relatively slow and can sometimes fail outright,

So your path is used as it is.

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