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Obviously, this is a bit of a "it depends" question, but what HTML element makes the most sense to provide the clearest meaning of "Hey, you, I think this is an important word!"?

I realize I could just use <b> tags, but that simply provides visual emphasis (unless, of course, I use Eric Meyer's reset.css. Then you get nothing...). I am curious what would provide a better semantic meaning. So far my searches lead me to believe mark could make sense, especially if I wanted to query the page content later to extract keywords, but it feels like I'd be using the element incorrectly.

EDIT:

Per @Paul D. Waite's suggestion, let me try to explain what I mean by "keyword."

Let's say I wrote a blog post or tutorial about how to, say, write a simple WPF application. When I reference language constructs, namespaces, classes, etc. I tend to use the <code> or <samp> tags (along with some monospace fonts to reinforce visually that I am making technical references). Now, if I wanted to emphasize a word or phrase, say "visual tree", as a way of making sure the reader knows I think that was a term they should get used to hearing (or look for more information about), is a simple <strong> or <em> element really the best way to mark this up?

Hope this makes sense.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As per the spec, it looks like you want <strong>:

The strong element represents strong importance for its contents.

http://dev.w3.org/html5/spec-author-view/the-strong-element.html#the-strong-element

The section of the spec for <mark> even has an example of how <mark> and <strong> differ.

It really depends what you mean by “keyword”. Could you provide an example of the content you’re trying to mark up?

Edit: if you’re emphasising a word because it’s the defining instance of a term (i.e. you’re defining it in the same paragraph), then you can use the <dfn> tag.

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Yep, I would say you are correct. I made an attempt to find this sort of reference myself. Guess my Google skills need improvement. As for an example? Hmm. Well, I'm rewriting my website again, so an example page could be.. http://geeksneversleep.com/tutorials/c-xml-and-linq-deleting-an-xml-node. Yes, I know the code itself is horrible... :p –  Tieson T. Aug 20 '11 at 1:20
    
@Tieson: ah, looks fine to me: it validates, so you’re doing better than most. Which words in that article would be the “keywords” that you want to mark as important? –  Paul D. Waite Aug 20 '11 at 1:32
    
Mwah. I should have chosen a better example. I suppose for that page in particular I've been wondering if using <code> was really the right way to emphasize words like FirstOrDefault() in the last paragraph. To honest, I'm looking more for best practice going forward, rather than fixing much of what I have (which may or may not get deleted eventually, depending on my mood). –  Tieson T. Aug 20 '11 at 1:40
    
Ah yes — <code> doesn’t emphasise words, it marks them as computer code (see dev.w3.org/html5/spec-author-view/…;, so you’re using it correctly as far as I can see. (I don’t see any need for that code to be emphasised in that paragraph.) –  Paul D. Waite Aug 20 '11 at 2:00
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Very nice. Well, it seems I simply need to read the spec more, so I've marked your answer as the most correct. I appreciate your input. Thanks! –  Tieson T. Aug 20 '11 at 2:05

<mark> is a fairly good choice for HTML 5, but it does carry the connotation of being marked to be referenced from elsewhere.

If you are just considering "importance" then you can consider

<span class="important">hello</span>

Span may not be that special element you are looking for, but it is not uncommon to use the class attribute to add semantics. The reason for this is that the element set of HTML can't grow arbitrarily large -- we can't have 1000's of tags for every kind of document markup you can think of. HTML already has var, kbd, samp, mark, and a few others, but this list needs to be finite and small. This is, I think, where span comes to the rescue. So you end up using CSS which is supposedly presentational, but you do so because there are limits on the number of actual HTML elements. So in a way, I would say span is an acceptable pragmatic choice.

However, if mark meets your needs exactly, you can use it. For the case you mentions, I think it would be an acceptable and proper use of the element.

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Well, you're the second resource to recommend doing that. If no one else makes a more compelling argument for something else, that may be the method I use. Thanks for the response. –  Tieson T. Aug 19 '11 at 6:00
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This is a good question because on the one hand "importance" is content, not presentation, so there should be an element for it. But the element set of HTML can't grow arbitrarily large -- we can't have 1000's of tags for every kind of document markup you can think of. This is, I think, where span comes to the rescue. So you end up using CSS which is supposedly presentational, but you do so because there are limits on the number of actual HTML elements. So in a way, I would say span is an acceptable pragmatic choice. –  Ray Toal Aug 19 '11 at 6:03
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The only thing is <span> doesn't have the inherit "I'm important!"-ness of, say, <strong>. –  sdleihssirhc Aug 19 '11 at 6:04
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Exactly, @sdleihssirhc, and that's why this question is good. You can't always find the perfect fit for the exact semantics you want in your document from the set of HTML elements, so you are left with span+class for many cases. It is imperfect but pragmatic. strong is close but I interpreted the OP's question as being one of important rather than emphasis. No easy answer here, but the takeaway is IMHO that span+class is an acceptable hack in general. Note that this is not an issue in extensible markup languages like XML. –  Ray Toal Aug 19 '11 at 6:12
    
@sdleihssirhc Yep. That's what I'm stuck on. I'm trying to improve my content's accessibility, as well, so I worry about throwing too many <strong> tags at a screen reader et al.. –  Tieson T. Aug 19 '11 at 6:21

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