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I have a Moose class that needs to send requests of type Foo::Request. I need to make this dependency accessible from the outside, so that I can easily exchange the request implementation in tests. I came up with the following attribute:

has request_builder => (
    is => 'rw',
    isa => 'CodeRef',
    default => sub {
        sub { Foo::Request->new(@_) }
    }
);

And then in code:

my $self = shift;
my $request = $self->request_builder->(path => …);

And in tests:

my $tested_class = …;
my $request = Test::MockObject->new;
$request->mock(…);
$tested_class->request_builder(sub { $request });

Is there a more simple / more idiomatic solution?

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2  
This doesn't answer your question, but you might be interested in the short blog entry by chromatic, which discusses the same technique: You're Already Using Dependency Injection –  Mike Aug 19 '11 at 13:54
2  
I like this solution and it is how I would solve it. The coderef gives you a lot of flexibility in how the object can be constructed. –  bvr Aug 19 '11 at 13:55
1  
@Mike: Thank you for the link. I’ve read the article some time ago and re-read it before posting this question. It’s a good reading, but does not address builders AFAIK. It’s just for “one-time” dependencies, not the ones that your class needs to build on the fly. –  zoul Aug 22 '11 at 8:05
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3 Answers

How about applying a role dynamically in your tests with Moose::Util::apply_all_roles? I have been wanting to use this for a while, but haven't had an excuse yet. Here is how I think it would work.

First, modify your original attribute slightly:

package MyClientThing;
has request => (
    is      => 'rw',
    isa     => 'Foo::Request',
    builder => '_build_request',
);
sub _build_request { Foo::Request->new };
....

Then create a Test::RequestBuilder role:

package Test::RequestBuilder;
use Moose::Role;
use Test::Foo::Request; # this module could inherit from Foo::Request I guess?
sub _build_request { return Test::Foo::Request->new }; 

Meanwhile in 't/my_client_thing.t' you would write something like this:

use MyClientThing;
use Moose::Util qw( apply_all_roles );
use Test::More;

my $client  = MyClientThing->new;
apply_all_roles( $client, 'Test::RequestBuilder' );  

isa_ok $client->request, 'Test::Foo::Request';

See Moose::Manual::Roles for more info.

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My suggestion, following the model in chromatic's article (comment above by Mike), is this:

In your class:

has request => (
    is => 'ro',
    isa => 'CodeRef',
    default => sub {
        Foo::Request->new(@_)
    }
);

In your test:

my $request = Test::MockObject->new;
$request->mock(…);
my $tested_class = MyClass->new(request => $request, ...);

Does exactly what your code does, with the following refinements:

  1. make the attribute read-only and set it in the constructor, if possible, for better encapsulation.
  2. your request attribute is a ready-to-use object; no need to dereference the sub ref
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1  
Actually, if you must have a builder in the class implementation, your example is the right thing. –  dmaestro12 Aug 21 '11 at 13:55
1  
Thank you. Yes, exactly, I need a builder, therefore I can’t go with the simple object setter as presented in chromatic’s blog post. It really looks like the coderef builder is the best solution. –  zoul Aug 22 '11 at 8:08
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Consider this approach:

In your Moose class define an 'abstract' method called make_request. Then define two roles which implement make_request - one which calls Foo::Request->new and another one which calls Test::MockObject->new.

Example:

Your main class and the two roles:

package MainMooseClass;
use Moose;
...
# Note: this class requires a role that
# provides an implementation of 'make_request'


package MakeRequestWithFoo;
use Moose::Role;
use Foo::Request; # or require it
sub make_request { Foo::Request->new(...) }

package MakeRequestWithMock;
use Moose::Role;
use Test::MockRequest;  # or require it
sub make_request { Test::MockRequest->new(...) }

If you want to test your main class, mix it with the 'MakeRequestWithMock' role:

package TestVersionOfMainMooseClass;
use Moose;
extends 'MainMooseClass';
with 'MakeRequestWithMock';

package main;
my $test_object = TestVersionOfMainMooseClass->new(...);

If you want to use it with the Foo implementation of 'make_request', mix it in with the 'MakeRequestWithFoo' role.

Some advantages:

You will only load in modules that you need. For instance, the class TestVersionOfMainMooseClass will not load the module Foo::Request.

You can add data that is relevant/required by your implementation of make_request as instance members of your new class. For example, your original approach of using a CODEREF can be implemented with this role:

package MakeRequestWithCodeRef;
use Moose::Role;
has request_builder => (
  is => 'rw',
  isa => 'CodeRef',
  required => 1,
);
sub make_request { my $self = shift; $self->request_builder->(@_) };

To use this class you need to supply an initializer for request_builder, e.g.:

package Example;
use Moose;
extends 'MainMooseClass';
with 'MakeRequestWithCodeRef';

package main;
my $object = Example->new(request_builder => sub { ... });

As a final consideration, the roles you write might be usable with other classes.

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