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Consider the following simple code

import java.util.*;

public class MainTest<T extends Object1<?,?>> {
    List<T> list;

    public MainTest(List<T> l) {
        this.list=l;
    }
    public int testCompare() {
        // fails to compile here
        return list.get(0).compareTo(list.get(1));
    }

    public static void main(String[]args) {
        List<Object1Impl> list = new ArrayList<Object1Impl>();
        list.add(new Object1Impl());
        list.add(new Object1Impl());

        MainTest<Object1Impl> test = new MainTest<Object1Impl>(list);
        System.out.println(test.testCompare());
    }
}

interface Object1<E, V> extends Comparable<Object1<E,V>> { }
class Object1Impl implements Object1<Integer, Integer>{
    public int compareTo(Object1<Integer, Integer> o) { return 0; }
}

I am aware that in this case the program will not compile (fails at testCompare() because T is extending unbounded Object1<?,?>). Is there any alternative to fix this besides making MainTest<T extends Object1<E,V>,E,V>?

EDIT: the error message is

The method compareTo(Object1<capture#1-of ?,capture#2-of ?>) in the type Comparable<Object1<capture#1-of ?,capture#2-of ?>> is not applicable for the arguments (T)

I have read Effective Java book but still can't really think of a solution..

Also, why is it that if I change interface Object1 into an abstract class the program will compile without any problem? This really puzzles me...

EDIT: when I mean changing into abstract class is as follows

abstract class Object1<E, V> implements Comparable<Object1<E,V>>{ 
    public int compareTo(Object1<E,V> o) { return 0; }
}

class Object1Impl extends Object1<Integer, Integer>{ }

this will work (only if using Eclipse, compiling it manually using javac does not work) but I have no idea why

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried public class MainTest<T extends Object1>? –  Serabe Aug 19 '11 at 7:55
    
well that means I'm using raw type of Object1 which defeat the purpose of generics though... but that would work with warnings –  GantengX Aug 19 '11 at 7:57
1  
At an erasure level, is the same. –  Serabe Aug 19 '11 at 8:00
    
May you update your question with your warnings? –  Serabe Aug 19 '11 at 8:00
    
does anyone know why changing Object1 to abstract class does not make compile error? –  GantengX Aug 19 '11 at 8:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is correct; the compiler has no way to verify that list.get(0) and list.get(1) are of the same type; one might be Object1<String, Integer> and the other Object1<BigDecimal, Double>.

To make sure that they are of the same type, you would have to bind those types:

public class MainTest<A,B,T extends Object1<A,B>> {
    List<T> list;

    public MainTest(List<T> l) {
        this.list=l;
    }
    public int testCompare() {
        // fails to compile here
        return list.get(0).compareTo(list.get(1));
    }

    public static void main(String[]args) {
        List<Object1Impl> list = new ArrayList<Object1Impl>();
        list.add(new Object1Impl());
        list.add(new Object1Impl());

        MainTest<Integer, Integer, Object1Impl> test = new MainTest<Integer, Integer, Object1Impl>(list);
        System.out.println(test.testCompare());
    }
}

As far as I know, Java doesn't allow binding parameter types to classes without specifically specifying them.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah I know one of the solution is not to use ?,? but to implement something like MainTest<T extends Object1<E,V>,E,V>? (which what you did). I was hoping if there's another way though.. –  GantengX Aug 19 '11 at 8:08
    
@GantengX You could internally cast to Object1 (without generic parameters, i.e. raw type) - list.get(0).compareTo((Object1)list.get(1)) - but note that this is quite unsafe and you'll have to know what you're doing. I'd favor Joeri's solution. –  Thomas Aug 19 '11 at 8:15

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