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I know there are tons of these but I am still stuck, I have the following code:

public void SetUser(User user)
{
   string streetNumber = "";

   if (user.Address.StreetNo != null)
      streetNumber = user.Address.StreetNo.ToString();
   else
     streetNumber = "";
}

I get the ever popular "Object reference not set to an instance of an object." issue. it's probably something very basic that my noob mind can't pick up on, but I would appreciate your help so thanks in advanced.

share|improve this question
    
Is user an instance of User? –  Baszz Aug 19 '11 at 8:21
    
First check if user is not null then user.Address not null and only then StreeNo... –  Darius Kucinskas Aug 19 '11 at 8:21
    
where does the stacktrace point you to? are you sure that "user" will not be null? Sorry but I can't tell from your code. It might be the Address of the user is null it might be the StreeetNo - it might be almost everything in there –  Carsten König Aug 19 '11 at 8:22
    
Thanks for the comments guys, they were write and go along with the answer curt has provided. The Stack did show the user exsisted but I wasn't doing the check. –  Anicho Aug 19 '11 at 9:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
public void SetUser(User user)
{
   string streetNumber = "";

   if (user != null && user.Address != null && user.Address.StreetNo != null) {
      streetNumber = user.Address.StreetNo.ToString();
   }
}

Taking into account @CKoenig's suggestion, the following throws an exception if the user or user.Address are null:

public void SetUser(User user)
{

   if (user == null) {
       throw new System.ArgumentNullException("user", "user cannot be null");
   }

   if (user.Address == null) {
       throw new System.ArgumentNullException("Address", "Address cannot be null");
   }

   string streetNumber = "";

   if (user.Address.StreetNo != null) {
      streetNumber = user.Address.StreetNo.ToString();
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would recommend throwing if either is null - the method is named "SetUser" if it can't because there is nothing to set it should not pretent to do. –  Carsten König Aug 19 '11 at 8:24
    
The method name has to be wrong. It doesn't do anything like the method body describes. –  Amy Aug 19 '11 at 8:29
1  
@Curt: I suggest using ArgumentNullException at least for the case where user is null, since this is a more specific exception type. –  cdhowie Aug 19 '11 at 8:41
1  
@Curt : take a look at this: 1) if user == null THEN THROW EXCEPTION; 2) THROW ArgumnentNullException 3) First parameter of ArgumentNullExceptio - parameter name; 4) Why you need else to assign empty string? It is already assigned by default by your code before –  sll Aug 19 '11 at 8:44
1  
@Curt : you still throwing an exception when user != null, does this make any sense? –  sll Aug 19 '11 at 8:51
public void SetUser(User user) 
{    
   string streetNumber = String.Empty;     

   if (user!= null 
       && user.Address != null 
       && user.Address.StreetNo != null)       
   {
         streetNumber = user.Address.StreetNo.ToString();    
   }
}
share|improve this answer

Either user is null, or user.Address is null. You need to test them too.

share|improve this answer
    
No, you missed this clause: if (user.Address.StreetNo != null). He is already checking if user.Address.StreetNo is null. The problem is that this test itself will throw the exception if either of user or user.Address are null. –  cdhowie Aug 19 '11 at 8:24
    
so sorry- you are right ... better think first ... but alas then there will be 10 answers ;) –  Carsten König Aug 19 '11 at 8:25
    
Thanks guys +1 because you were right accepted curts because he provided code with answer. –  Anicho Aug 19 '11 at 9:17

Check your stacktrace and:

  • user
  • user.Address
  • user.Address.StreetNo

with an if ... == null then ...

share|improve this answer
if (user != null
    && user.Address != null
    && user.Address.StreetNo != null)
{
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer

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