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Shot in the dark here, but is there any library or tool for declaratively querying large (>> memory) XML files (in a streaming fashion)?

To illustrate what I want to do: the Wikipedia XML dumps look like:

...
  <page>
    <title>AccessibleComputing</title>
    <id>10</id>
    <redirect />
    <revision>
      <id>233192</id>
      <timestamp>2001-01-21T02:12:21Z</timestamp>
      <contributor>
        <username>RoseParks</username>
        <id>99</id>
      </contributor>
      <comment>*</comment>
      <text id="233192" bytes="124" />
    </revision>
    <revision>
      <id>862220</id>
      <timestamp>2002-02-25T15:43:11Z</timestamp>
      <contributor>
        <ip>Conversion script</ip>
      </contributor>
      <minor/>
      <comment>Automated conversion</comment>
      <text id="862220" bytes="35" />
    </revision>
...

I want to convert this into CSV so that I can import into Postgresql for further analysis:

revisionid,pageid,username,userid,textsize
233192,10,RoseParks,99,124
...

It would be awesome if I could do something along these lines (to repurpose XPath/XQuery syntax):

for $p in /page
  for $r in $p/revision[contributor/username]
    return $r/id/text(),
           $p/id/text(),
           $r/contributor/username/text(),
           $r/contributor/id/text(),
           $r/text/@bytes

These types of queries should really take no more than constant memory (for fixed-depth XML), and basically just need to keep a stack of elements.

I tried a few XQuery/XSLT implementations including Saxon and Galax, but they all blew through my memory.

Currently I'm just writing a SAX event parser, but it's tedious to maintain the stack of nodes we're traversing and reimplement what XPath does easily and whatnot (especially for more complex files than this Wikipedia example), so I'm thinking of writing a more generic library and I'm curious whether this already exists.

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An XSLT engine might be able to do this efficiently, depending on how it is implemented. – cdhowie Aug 19 '11 at 8:34
1  
Unfortunately the XSLT implementations that I tried (e.g. Saxon) didn't cut it, but I'm all ears if you know of one that works (or if I'm doing something wrong with Saxon, though IIRC I found in writing elsewhere that it does require the file be fully in memory). – Yang Aug 19 '11 at 8:43

You might try using a StAX library instead of SAX. StAX is a pull, not push library so its a LOT easier to keep track of state. Its not xquery though.

You may also be interested in the StaX support in xmlsh which is very efficient but a lot easier (less code writing) then writing directly in Java.

http://www.xmlsh.org/FunctionsStAX

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The Nux library claims to support XQuery in a streaming fashion. Here's the API.

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