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I am turning a project of mine into C from C++ and things have been going smoothly since I did not use a lot of C++ functionality to begin with. But I came across a peculiar problem which I have managed to replicate in a small test program. It does not make sense to me so I will try to explain with code.

typedef struct foo
{
    int num1;
    float num2;
    char* name;
}foo;

//This function allocates and initializes a foo object
foo* Initfoo()
{
    foo* f = malloc(sizeof(foo));
    f->num1 = 1024;
    f->num2 = 3.14;

    f->name = malloc(100);
    strcpy(f->name,"eleos re paidia");

    //Just before returning here by checking the f pointer we can see
    // it is initialized correctly
    return f;
}



 void afunctest(foo* f)
 {
    ///... suppose this function does stuff before ...

    //here it initializes the foo pointer
    f = Initfoo();
    ///...and after here suppose the function also does more stuff..

    //by checking at this point in the program the pointer is still initialized 
    //correctly to   what InitFoo initialized it to
    int asd =5;
 }


int main()
{

    foo* f = 0;

    //should do stuff and also initialize the foo* f
    afunctest(f);

    //when we check here the pointer f is still 0 as if afunctest() function never ran
    int asd = 5;

    return 0;
}

So basically in a few words, we declare a foo pointer and initialize it to zero. Then we pass that pointer to afunctest() function which should do stuff and also initialize it for later use. Inside the afunctest() function it seems to be initialized correctly but as soon as we get back to main() it still has the value of 0 as if the function never ran.

At first I thought it was a really intricate bug in my original program since it has gotten quite complicated but being able to replicate it here means I am missing something fundamental about the usage of pointers in C compared to C++. Can you people point that out? What am I doing wrong? Thanks in advance for any feedback.

P.S.: My compiler is GCC under Windows 7.

share|improve this question
1  
I bet your corresponding C++ function has a different signature, or it also wouldn't work there... – sth Aug 19 '11 at 9:02
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are changing your local copy of f. This has no effect for the caller.

void afunctest(foo* f)
{
    f = Initfoo(); /* No effect for the caller of afunctest
}

Try something like this:

void afunctest(foo **f)
{
    /* ... */
    *f = Initfoo();
}

/* In main. */
foo* f = 0;
functest(&f);

Incidentally, there is also a C FAQ: Pass pointer Init.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh so C always passes by value. That's good to know. Got a lot of code to check for similar mistakes then. Thank you it makes sense now. – Lefteris Aug 19 '11 at 9:07
    
Thanks. The FAQ also does explain it as you said. Feel really stupid I did not know that already. – Lefteris Aug 19 '11 at 9:11
    
@Lefteris: Note that this is just the same as in C++. C++ only passes by reference if you explicitly specify that the parameter is a reference (with &). Generally C++ references are more like pointers than raw values, so a foo *&f parameter would usually translate to a foo **f rather than a foo *f. – sth Aug 19 '11 at 9:25
    
Yeah I know that C++ does it like that. I might have confused the parameters in the function on my project and did not observe the references and translate them to double pointers. Now I know and am very happy to have found a major bug :) – Lefteris Aug 19 '11 at 10:43

The solution is actually quiet straight forward - remember C always passes by value so when you set f in the afunctest function that DOESN'T update your f in the main function.

To do this you need to use **f like so:

void afunctest(foo** f)
 {

    //here it initializes the foo pointer
    *f = Initfoo();

 }

and call it like so:

int main()
{

    foo* f = 0;

    //should do stuff and also initialize the foo* f
    afunctest(&f);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. It makes sense now. Got to check all my code then for functions hierarchies passing pointers. – Lefteris Aug 19 '11 at 9:12

C is pass by value. If you want to change f from within afunctest(), you will need to pass a pointer to it and manipulate the value it points to.

For example:

#include <stdio.h>

static void fn (int x, int *y) {
    x = 42;     // Changes local copy of x, doesn't affect a.
    *y = 42;    // Changes value *pointed to* by local y (which is b in caller).
}

int main (void) {
    int a = 1;
    int b = 1;
    fn (a, &b); // Pass a and *address of* b.

    printf ("%d %d\n", a, b);
    return 0;
}

results in the output:

1 42

In terms of the code you have, that would be:

void afunctest (foo **f) {
    *f = Initfoo();
}

int main (void) {
    foo* f = 0;
    afunctest (&f);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh so C always passes by value. That's good to know. Got a lot of code to check for similar mistakes then. Thank you it makes sense now. – Lefteris Aug 19 '11 at 9:08

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