Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Here's something we all learned on Day 1 of C++, which we take for granted but doesn't clearly follow from the wording of the Standard.

Given a class S, we can define its constructor

struct S { S(); };
S::S() { … }

But the Standard seems to allow this just as well:

struct S { S(); };
S() { … }

Qualifying the name of a class with itself is always allowed but always redundant. For example S::S::S::S() { … } is also a valid declaration. If S::S is, why not plain S?

From C++11 §12.1/1,

Constructors do not have names. A special declarator syntax is used to declare or define the constructor. The syntax uses:

— an optional decl-specifier-seq in which each decl-specifier is either a function-specifier or constexpr,

— the constructor’s class name, and

— a parameter list

in that order.

This applies equally to class or namespace scope. There is a special rule about namespace scope, §9.3/5,

If the definition of a member function is lexically outside its class definition, the member function name shall be qualified by its class name using the :: operator.

However, constructors do not have names, so this doesn't apply, right? Moreover, there's no reason to require the qualification, because there is no syntactic ambiguity. A function declared with no return type and a class-name for an identifier is always a syntax error under currently observed rules. Right?

Not that we should start writing code with the qualification omitted, but is there a reason that no compiler accepts this, or is it just tradition?

share|improve this question
4  
You sire, have a wicked mind. I am interested in the discussion that's going to ensue. –  Matthieu M. Aug 19 '11 at 9:45
    
Who gave this a -1?? And WHY? –  Nim Aug 19 '11 at 9:56
1  
@Nim: I think someone doesn't like what I might do to their beloved language. Unfortunately, now my rep score will be 2 off from a multiple of 5 until I can accept an answer to this question. –  Potatoswatter Aug 19 '11 at 10:05
    
@Potatoswatter, you could always go around and down vote three times! ;) –  Nim Aug 19 '11 at 10:51
    
@Potatoswatter: Based on your quotations I think you could equally say that since a constructor is a member function (even though it doesn't have a name), and since its member function name cannot possibly be qualified (since it doesn't have a name), therefore constructors may not be defined lexically outside their class definition! Except that, the text about class-name::class-name quoted by Eric Z is another special-case syntax for constructors, and that is what permits S::S() but not plain S() in namespace scope. –  Steve Jessop Aug 19 '11 at 11:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When faced with the tokens S() { } at namespace scope, the compiler can't magically decide it's a ctor. Which grammar rule would produce such a sequence of tokens? Let's ignore everything but function-definitions; they can't produce the ( ){ } part.

That means that S() must be a declarator , and the decl-specifier-seqopt has to be empty (see §8.4.1). §9.2/7 subsequently tells us that the declarator must name a constructor, destructor, or conversion function. But S doesn't name either. Therefore, S() { } is invalid.

share|improve this answer
    
9.2/7 says "The decl-specifier-seq may be omitted in constructor, destructor, and conversion function declarations only…" It doesn't say anything about what the declarator names, so the implementation should check against 12.1 to see if it's a constructor. This applies equally to class and namespace scope, and S is the same class-name in either case. –  Potatoswatter Aug 19 '11 at 16:04
    
@Potatoswatter: Yes, the compiler has restricted the possible options to those three, it then needs to check which of those it is. Since there's no ~ nor an operator, the only possible option indeed is a ctor. Which one? At global scope, S doesn't name a ctor but a class. –  MSalters Aug 22 '11 at 8:03

Yes, it says that,

If the definition of a member function is lexically outside its class definition the member function name shall be qualified by its class name using the :: operator.

But it doesn't says that member function w/o name shall not be qualified by its class name. Does it? ;)

That seems to lead to an uncertain area depending on implementations. However, the form of A::A is defined by the Standard.

5.1 Primary Expressions

Where class-name :: class-name is used, and the two class-names refer to the same class, this notation names the constructor..

As to whether A(){..} is allowed or not, I guess there is no reason to do it conventionally(Is there ANY C++ compiler allow it?? AFAIK, nope):

  1. Since constructor is a special member function, the way of A::A(){..} is more consistent with other member functions. Why borther allow it to behave specially? That's probably not worth the effort.

  2. No one wants to run the risk of writing non-compliant code that's not explicitly stated in the Standard.

share|improve this answer
    
This does not forbid struct S { S(); }; S() { … }. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 19 '11 at 10:12
    
Also, that only applies to expressions, while the syntax from 12.1/1 takes the place of a declarator. However, I didn't know about that, so now I'm curious, is there any valid expression which names the constructor? –  Potatoswatter Aug 19 '11 at 10:24
    
"But it doesn't says that member function w/o name shall not be qualified by its class name. Does it? ;)" It does say that constructors can be declared and defined without qualification. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 19 '11 at 10:24
    
@R.Martinho, could you please quote where it is said? –  Eric Z Aug 19 '11 at 10:43
2  
@Eric: it's on the question: §12.1/1 "(...) A special declarator syntax is used to declare or define the constructor (...)". The non-optional parts are: the class name, and the parameter list. The constructor "name" is not required. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 19 '11 at 10:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.