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This is very easy, I am stuck to figure out how that is used actually,

template<class C>
struct P{
};

template<> 
struct P<int>{};

Is there a real application for such specific specialization ?

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2  
It's a little hard to tell without any context. –  Oliver Charlesworth Aug 19 '11 at 11:17
    
Like you want to say that they are actually both empty? –  Jan Hudec Aug 19 '11 at 11:46
    
While not a really good thing for other reasons, that is actually done inside the STL, std::vector<bool> is an specialization of the std::vector<> template –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 19 '11 at 13:39

1 Answer 1

while your specific example doesn't seem too interesting, template specialization is widely used. Here's an example:

template< class T >
struct StringConverter
{
  static std::string Convert( const T& )
  {
    //do some conversion from T to string using stringstream for instance
    //and return result
  }
}

template<>
struct StringConverter< std::string >
{
  static std::string Convert( const std::string& t )
  {
    //no need for conversion here!
    return t;
  }
}

//usage:
std::string a = StringConverter< int >::Convert( 5 ); //default impl
std::string b = StringConverter< std::string >::Convert( "b" ); //specialized
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2  
For a moment I read wildly instead of widely. Seemed more appropriate ;-) –  rodrigo Aug 19 '11 at 11:30
    
@rodrigo aha nice one –  stijn Aug 19 '11 at 11:43

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