Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I limit the object of any class to one. My class looks like :

class Speaker
  include Mongoid::Document
  field :name, :type => String
end

I just want to let a single instance of speaker . One way would be to add a validation which would check the number of objects already present of the Speaker class. Is there a ruby way of doing thing ?

share|improve this question
    
If you want only one speaker, does it makes sense to store it in db. I would have extracted it to a config file. –  rubish Aug 19 '11 at 19:49
1  
@rubish I need to allow the admin to change the value. How would I do that efficiently if I don't save it in the database ? –  Prabesh Shrestha Aug 20 '11 at 3:03
    
yes that makes sense –  rubish Aug 20 '11 at 5:13
    
what about validation, as I wrote below? –  Sławosz Aug 22 '11 at 11:02
    
@Slawosz I think that is the best thing I can do right now. Just waiting if I can find any better solution. –  Prabesh Shrestha Aug 22 '11 at 11:34

6 Answers 6

How about using the Singleton module?

share|improve this answer
    
how do I change the value . I also want the value to persist. –  Prabesh Shrestha Aug 19 '11 at 17:24
    
If it's the Admin USER changing the value, then this answer has a code smell. Otherwise see stackoverflow.com/questions/137975/… for lengthly debate. –  Alexander Wenzowski Aug 31 '11 at 22:42

In this case I would write proper validation:

validate :only_one

def only_one
   errors.add(:base, "Only one Speaker can exist") if self.count > 0 
end
share|improve this answer
    
This will fail if the record already exists and you're updating it. –  Steven Soroka Aug 26 '11 at 6:14
    
Good point, but you can write: validate :only_one, :on => :create –  Sławosz Aug 26 '11 at 8:13
1  
NoMethodError: undefined method `count` for #<Speaker:0x28f18e1d> - self in the context of a validation method is an instance, so self.count needs to be changed to Speaker.count or self.class.count –  Abe Voelker Apr 2 '13 at 22:17
    
self.class is better, thanks for noticing it. –  Sławosz Apr 3 '13 at 16:05

I recommend using a class/module that is tailored to storing configuration values rather rolling your own on top of a vanilla ActiveRecord model.

I use a old copy of the rails-settings plugin with some custom modification (it still works just fine in Rails 3). There are also a number of variant offerings listed on Github, so feel free to look and take your pick.

share|improve this answer

Why not provide a default Speaker object, and just not provide controller actions for create or delete?

Seems the simplest solution by far.

share|improve this answer

I see you're using Mongoid

The functionality you request is not available using mongoid validations.

Therefore, you will need to write your own. before_validation is a supported callback and chained Speaker.all.count methods are available to your model.

class Speaker
  include Mongoid::Document
  field :name, :type => String
  before_validation(:ensure_has_only_one_record, :on => :create)
  def ensure_has_only_one_record
    self.errors.add :base, "There can only be one Speaker." if Speaker.all.count > 0
  end
end

However, the best practice is to put all key/value settings in a single table.

share|improve this answer

Using the Singleton module and a little overriding of its methods, I believe this works and it's thread safe (on ruby 1.8):

class Speaker 

  include Singleton
  include Mongoid::Document
  field :name, :type => String

  @@singleton__instance__ = nil
  @@singleton__mutex__ = Mutex.new

  def self.instance
    return @@singleton__instance__ if @@singleton__instance__
    @@singleton__mutex__.synchronize {
      return @@singleton__instance__ if @@singleton__instance__
      @@singleton__instance__ = self.first
      @@singleton__instance__ ||= new()
    }
    @@singleton__instance__
  end

  def destroy
    @@singleton__mutex__.synchronize {
      super
      @@singleton__instance__ = nil
    }
  end

end
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for pointing that out. Back in Ruby 1.8 that was not the case. –  andersonvom Apr 8 '13 at 12:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.