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Is there a math library that has the methods getMean(), getMedian(), getMode(), and getRange()?

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closed as not a real question by Lukas Knuth, musiKk, Andreas_D, Mark, Graviton Aug 19 '11 at 13:04

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What should that library do? –  Lukas Knuth Aug 19 '11 at 11:58
2  
@lukas, Math.... –  RMT Aug 19 '11 at 12:12
    
What is unclear? He's asking if anyone knows of a library. What could be simpler? –  orbfish Apr 2 at 0:20

2 Answers 2

I'm guessing you mean the math mean, etc. I'm not sure about that, but you can always create the methods yourself!

getMean()

public double getMean(double[] numberList) {
    double total;
    for (double d: numberList) {
        total += d;
    }
    return total / (numberList.length);
}

getMedian()

This method is going on the assumption that the passed array is already sorted (i.e. {1,2,3,...}).

public double getMedian(double[] numberList) {
    int factor = numberList.length - 1;
    double[] first = new double[(double) factor / 2];
    double[] last = new double[first.length];
    double[] middleNumbers = new double[1];
    for (int i = 0; i < first.length; i++) {
        first[i] = numbersList[i];
    }
    for (int i = numberList.length; i > last.length; i--) {
        last[i] = numbersList[i];
    }
    for (int i = 0; i <= numberList.length; i++) {
        if (numberList[i] != first[i] || numberList[i] != last[i]) middleNumbers[i] = numberList[i];
    }
    if (numberList.length % 2 == 0) {
        double total = middleNumbers[0] + middleNumbers[1];
        return total / 2;
    } else {
        return middleNumbers[0];
    }
}

getMode()

public double getMode(double[] numberList) {
    HashMap<Double,Double> freqs = new HashMap<Double,Double>();
    for (double d: numberList) {
        Double freq = freqs.get(d);
        freqs.put(d, (freq == null ? 1 : freq + 1));   
    }
    double mode = 0;
    double maxFreq = 0;    
    for (Map.Entry<Double,Doubler> entry : freqs.entrySet()) {     
        double freq = entry.getValue();
        if (freq > maxFreq) {
            maxFreq = freq;
            mode = entry.getKey();
        }
    }    
    return mode;
}

getRange()

public double getRange(double[] numberList) {
    double initMin = numberList[0];
    double initMax = numberList[0];
    for (int i = 1; i <= numberList.length; i++) {
        if (numberList[i] < initMin) initMin = numberList[i];
        if (numberList[i] > initMax) initMax = numberList[i];
    }
    return initMax - initMin;
}       
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These might not be the most efficient implementations. You can calculate mean and standard deviation as running totals rather than having to have an entire array. This can mean a significant memory savings. And keeping a sorted list will shrink most of the other implementations. I'd think of these as reference implementations only. –  duffymo Aug 19 '11 at 13:06
1  
@duffymo Ambiguous questions get (relatively) ambiguous answers. –  fireshadow52 Aug 19 '11 at 22:20
    
What is ambiguous? I don't get this. –  orbfish Apr 2 at 0:21

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