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Below show is the creation on the singleton object.

public class Map_en_US extends mapTree {

    private static Map_en_US m_instance;

    private Map_en_US() {}

    static{
        m_instance = new Map_en_US();
        m_instance.init();
    }

    public static Map_en_US getInstance(){
        return m_instance;
    }

    @Override
    protected void init() {
        //some code;
    }
}

My question is what is the reason for using a static block for instantiating. i am familiar with below form of instantiation of the singleton.

public static Map_en_US getInstance(){
    if(m_instance==null)
      m_instance = new Map_en_US();
}
share|improve this question

10 Answers 10

up vote 24 down vote accepted

The reason is thread safety.

The form you said you are familiar with has the potential of initializing the singleton a large number of times. Moreover, even after it has been initialized multiple times, future calls to getInstance() by different threads might return different instances! Also, one thread might see a partially-initialized singleton instance! (let's say the constructor connects to a DB and authenticates; one thread might be able to get a reference to the singleton before the authentication happens, even if it is done in the constructor!)

There are some difficulties when dealing with threads:

  1. Concurrency: they have to potential to execute concurrently;

  2. Visibility: modifications to the memory made by one thread might not be visible to other threads;

  3. Reordering: the order in which the code is executed cannot be predicted, which can lead to very strange results.

You should study about these difficulties to understand precisely why those odd behaviors are perfectly legal in the JVM, why they are actually good, and how to protect from them.

The static block is guaranteed, by the JVM, to be executed only once (unless you load and initialize the class using different ClassLoaders, but the details are beyond the scope of this question, I'd say), and by one thread only, and the results of it are guaranteed to be visible to every other thread.

That's why you should initialize the singleton on the static block.

My preferred pattern: thread-safe and lazy

The pattern above will instantiate the singleton on the first time the execution sees a reference to the class Map_en_US (actually, only a reference to the class itself will load it, but might not yet initialize it; for more details, check the reference). Maybe you don't want that. Maybe you want the singleton to be initialized only on the first call to Map_en_US.getInstance() (just as the pattern you said you are familiar with supposedly does).

If that's what you want, you can use the following pattern:

public class Singleton {
  private Singleton() { ... }
  private static class SingletonHolder {
    private static final Singleton instance = new Singleton();
  }
  public static Singleton getInstance() {
    return SingletonHolder.instance;
  }
}

In the code above, the singleton will only be instantiated when the class SingletonHolder is initialized. This will happen only once (unless, as I said before, you are using multiple ClassLoaders), the code will be executed by only one thread, the results will have no visibility problems, and the initialization will occur only on the first reference to SingletonHolder, which happens inside the getInstance() method. This is the pattern I use most often when I need a singleton.

Another patterns...

1. synchronized getInstace()

As discussed in the comments to this answer, there's another way to implement the singleton in a thread safe manner, and which is almost the same as the (broken) one you are familiar with:

public class Singleton {
  private static Singleton instance;
  public static synchronized getInstance() {
    if (instance == null)
      instance = new Singleton();
  }
}

The code above is guaranteed, by the memory model, to be thread safe. The JVM specification states the following (in a more cryptic way): let L be the lock of any object, let T1 and T2 be two threads. The release of L by T1 happens-before the acquisition of L by T2.

This means that every thing that has been done by T1 before releasing the lock will be visible to every other thread after they acquire the same lock.

So, suppose T1 is the first thread that entered the getInstance() method. Until it has finished, no other thread will be able to enter the same method (since it is synchronized). It will see that instance is null, will instantiate a Singleton and store it in the field. It will then release the lock and return the instance.

Then, T2, which was waiting for the lock, will be able to acquire it and enter the method. Since it acquired the same lock that T1 just released, T2 will see that the field instance contains the exact same instance of Singleton created by T1, and will simply return it. What is more, the initialization of the singleton, which has been done by T1, happened before the release of the lock by T1, which happened before the acquisition of the lock by T2, therefore there's no way T2 can see a partially-initialized singleton.

The code above is perfectly correct. The only problem is that the access to the singleton will be serialized. If it happens a lot, it will reduce the scalability of your application. That's why I prefer the SingletonHolder pattern I showed above: access to the singleton will be truly concurrent, without the need for synchronization!

2. Double checked locking (DCL)

Often, people are scared about the cost of lock acquisition. I've read that nowadays it is not that relevant for most applications. The real problem with lock acquisition is that it hurts scalability by serializing access to the synchronized block.

Someone devised an ingenuous way to avoid acquiring a lock, and it has been called double-checked locking. The problem is that most implementations are broken. That is, most implementations are not thread-safe (ie, are as thread-unsafe as the getInstace() method on the original question).

The correct way to implement the DCL is as follows:

public class Singleton {
  private static volatile Singleton instance;
  public static Singleton getInstance() {
    if (instance == null) {
      synchronized {
        if (instance == null) {
          instance = new Singleton();
        }
      }
    }
    return instance;
  }
}

The difference between this correct and an incorrect implementation is the volatile keyword.

To understand why, let T1 and T2 be two threads. Let's first assume that the field is not volatile.

T1 enters the getInstace() method. It's the first one to ever enter it, so the field is null. It then enters the synchronized block, then the second if. It also evaluates to true, so T1 creates a new instance of the singleton and stores it in the field. The lock is then release, and the singleton is returned. For this thread, it is guaranteed that the Singleton is completely initialized.

Now, T2 enters the getInstace() method. It is possible (although not guaranteed) that it will see that instance != null. It will then skip the if block (and so it will never acquire the lock), and will directly return the instance of the Singleton. Due to reordering, it is possible that T2 will not see all the initialization performed by the Singleton in its constructor! Revisiting the db connection singleton example, T2 might see a connected but not yet authenticated singleton!

For more information...

... I'd recommend a brilliant book, Java Concurrency in Practice, and also, the Java Language Specification.

share|improve this answer
    
"...by different threads might return different instances!" ---- How's that? –  Gruber Aug 19 '11 at 12:05
    
the reason for static block is not thread safety. The way it coded now, Map_en_US is unsafe (m_instance isn't final) –  gnat Aug 19 '11 at 12:09
1  
@Thomas .. Thx, got it! ... Hm, wouldn't synchronized make the getInstance method threadsafe?! –  Gruber Aug 19 '11 at 12:11
1  
@Gruber: multithreading is not for the faint of heart! –  Bruno Reis Aug 19 '11 at 12:25
3  
@Thomas: be careful with double checked locking... most of the implementations you will find on the internet are broken. To be done properly, remember that the field must be marked volatile; if it is not volatile, it is necessarily broken. –  Bruno Reis Aug 19 '11 at 12:51

If you initialize in the getInstance() method, you can get a racing conditions, i.e. if 2 threads execute the if(m_instance == null) check simulataneously, both might see the instance be null and thus both might call m_instance = new Map_en_US();

Since the static initializer block is executed only once (by one thread that is executing the class loader), you don't have a problem there.

Here's a good overview.

share|improve this answer
    
@Bruno AFAIK there's no per thread copy (unless you use ThreadLocal), thus after the variable is initialized, each call should return the same instance, shouldn't it? Thus assuming two thread call getInstance() after initialization, in which case might different instances be returned (by invoking it on the same class instance, so no classloading issues here)? –  Thomas Aug 19 '11 at 12:56
    
no. Each thread has a local working copy of each variable (ThreadLocal or not). Sometime they get synchronized to the main memory (ThreadLocal works as if it didn't synchronize to the main memory). You can force the synchronization using synchronized or volatile. Without synchronization, the JVM is free to flush the contents of the local working copy of the variable to the main memory at will (the behavior is implementation dependent). So, two different threads calling getInstance() might never be able to see the instance created by the other! –  Bruno Reis Aug 19 '11 at 13:05
    
@Bruno that makes sense, thanks for the explanation. I now also better understand your concerns about double checked locking. Would give you another +1 if I could :) –  Thomas Aug 19 '11 at 13:24

How about this approach for eradicating the static block:

private static Map_en_US s_instance = new Map_en_US() {{init();}};

It does the same thing, but is way neater.

Explanation of this syntax:
The outer set of braces creates an anonymous class.
The inner set of braces is called an "instance block" - it fires during construction.
This syntax is often incorrectly called the "double brace initializer" syntax, usually by those who don't understand what is going on.

Also, note:
m_ is a naming convention prefix for instance (ie member) fields.
s_ is a naming convention prefix for class (ie static) fields.
So I changed the name of the field to s_....

share|improve this answer
    
thx for the tip –  pushya Aug 19 '11 at 12:16
    
That wouldn't work for final classes, however. Basically the double brace syntax creates an anonymous subclass, which wouldn't compile in case Map_en_US was final. –  Thomas Aug 19 '11 at 12:58
    
@Bohemian: rigorously, it doesn't do the same thing. As you said, it creates an anonymous class that inherits from Map_en_US. Therefore Map_en_US cannot be marked final for this code to work. –  Bruno Reis Aug 19 '11 at 12:59
    
Big deal. So, if you get a final class (not common) don't use it. –  Bohemian Aug 19 '11 at 13:23
    
why not just call init in the constructor? –  Carlos Heuberger Aug 19 '11 at 22:16

It depends on how resource-intensive the init method is. If it e.g. does a lot of work, maybe you want that work done at the startup of the application instead of on the first call. Maybe it downloads the map from Internet? I don't know...

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The static block is executed when the class is first loaded by the JVM. As Bruno said, that helps with thread safety because there isn't a possibility that two threads will fight over the same getInstance() call for the first time.

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1  
Just remember that the static block can be executed more than once, if the class is loaded and initialized again by a different ClassLoader. –  Bruno Reis Aug 19 '11 at 12:54
  1. With static instantiation there will be only one copy of the instance per class irrespective of how many objects being created.
  2. Second advantage with the way is, The method is thread-safeas you are not doing anything in the method except returning the instance.
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There might be more than one instance if the class is loaded and initialized multiple times by different class loaders. –  Bruno Reis Aug 19 '11 at 13:10

the static block instances your class and call the default contructor (if any) only one time and when the application starts and all static elements are loaded by the JVM.

Using the getInstance() method the object for the class is builded and initialized when the method is called and not on the static initialization. And is not really safe if you are running the getInstance() in diferent threads at the same time.

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2  
The static block isn't called at application startup. It's called only when the class is loaded and initialized, which might never happen! –  Bruno Reis Aug 19 '11 at 13:09

static block is here to allow for init invocation. Other way to code it could be eg like this (which to prefer is a matter of taste)

public class Map_en_US extends mapTree {

    private static
            /* thread safe without final,
               see VM spec 2nd ed 2.17.15 */
            Map_en_US m_instance = createAndInit();

    private Map_en_US() {}

    public static Map_en_US getInstance(){
        return m_instance;
    }

    @Override
    protected void init() {
        //some code;
    }

    private static Map_en_US createAndInit() {
        final Map_en_US tmp = new Map_en_US();
        tmp.init();
        return tmp;
    }
}

update corrected per VM spec 2.17.5, details in comments

share|improve this answer
    
Agreed. the static block is also invoking the init(). My init() has Content that should is available when the singleton object is created –  pushya Aug 19 '11 at 12:22
    
@gnat: Final is totally irrelevant here. It does not add any thread-safety. You are mixing up the semantics of final keyword when used in instance fields. The code you propose is perfectly thread-safe without final. –  Bruno Reis Aug 19 '11 at 12:55
    
@Bruno care to provide JLS reference that would guarantee thread safety without final? –  gnat Aug 19 '11 at 13:18
1  
@gnat: Sure! Section 2.17.5: the lock acquisition/release on the Class object (that happens when a Thread verifies if a class is fully initialized and also when initializing the static, non-final fields -- which is the same time when the static block executes --) guarantee the visibility of the initial value of non-final, static fields due to the happens-before relation that exists between the release and acquisition of a given lock. –  Bruno Reis Aug 19 '11 at 13:41
    
Oh, by the way, that's the VM Spec, not the JLS. But I think it's at least as authoritative as the JLS in respect to this subject. –  Bruno Reis Aug 19 '11 at 13:43
    // Best way to implement the singleton class in java
    package com.vsspl.test1;

    class STest {

        private static STest ob= null;
        private  STest(){
            System.out.println("private constructor");
        }

        public static STest  create(){

            if(ob==null)
                ob = new STest();
            return ob;
        }

        public  Object  clone(){
            STest   obb = create();
            return obb;
        }
    }

    public class SingletonTest {
        public static void main(String[] args)  {
            STest  ob1 = STest.create();
            STest  ob2 = STest.create();
            STest  ob3 = STest.create();

            System.out.println("obj1  " +  ob1.hashCode());
            System.out.println("obj2  " +  ob2.hashCode());
            System.out.println("obj3  " +  ob3.hashCode());


            STest  ob4 = (STest) ob3.clone();
            STest  ob5 = (STest) ob2.clone();
            System.out.println("obj4  " +  ob4.hashCode());
            System.out.println("obj5  " +  ob5.hashCode());

        }
    }

-------------------------------- OUT PUT -------------------------------------
private constructor
obj1  1169863946
obj2  1169863946
obj3  1169863946
obj4  1169863946
obj5  1169863946
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Interesting never seen that before. Seems largely a style preference. I suppose one difference is: the static initialisation takes place at VM startup, rather than on first request for an instance, potentially eliminating an issue with concurrent instantiations? (Which can also be handled with synchronized getInstance() method declaration)

share|improve this answer
    
Wrong. The static initialization doesn't happen at VM startup. It happens only when the class is referenced (which might never happen). –  Bruno Reis Aug 19 '11 at 12:49
    
@bruno Then when is the static initialization happen? if it don't happen at the start up of the JVM. What do you mean by "it happens only when class referenced and you said that situation never happens" –  pushya Aug 19 '11 at 13:29
    
@FirstHearty: it happens when when a thread of execution first encounters a reference to the class. Let's say you have a main(...) { System.out.println("bye"); }, it doesn't use the class Singleton. So there's no need for the JVM to load the class Singleton. Therefore it won't be initialized. –  Bruno Reis Aug 19 '11 at 13:35
    
interesting, thanks –  Brian Aug 19 '11 at 13:46

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