Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two servers for a website. One server will have php code and database and another less speed server to store files only. I need to implement these in a way that file uploaded through the website must store at another server and also then can be downloaded from there.

Can anyone suggest me best way to achieve that. I know the files can be transferred to another server by FTP functions of php just after uploading through website but doesn't seems a correct way.

Or two server can be used for static media content like images only.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
What kind of files are being stored on the secondary server? –  ExtremeCoder Aug 19 '11 at 12:41
    
Needs much more info. What kind of OS are the servers running, do you have admin access to it.... –  Pekka 웃 Aug 19 '11 at 12:47
    
Thanks for comment, The files will be uploaded by application user. It may be pdf,doc and images. The server must be Linux based. I must be having admin access because without that it might not be possible –  phpian Aug 20 '11 at 4:39
    
Can anybody reply to my questions. Its urgent –  phpian Aug 22 '11 at 5:37

7 Answers 7

up vote 12 down vote accepted
+50

The best idea is to just have ALL the files, including the websites files on the "storage server". Basically what you do is mount the "shared folder", this means the websites files and other files you will be needing. (Most of the times you just have a /var/www-local/ folder on the storage server, which you mount in /var/www/ on the webserver).

Make sure you mount it using NFS by adding it in the /etc/fstab file on the webserver. (More info on NFS)

The advantage of this idea is that when you want to expand, this is easily possible by putting a software loadbalancer (like HAProxy), adding as much webservers as you like and you will have your data in sync.

share|improve this answer
    
It means there will be two server. The second server will be mounted into main server and by doing this application need not to think about another server. It will treated as one system no other urls for second server. –  phpian Aug 26 '11 at 6:04
    
This only answers part of the question, as you will not be able to use external space like a dedicated Content Distribution Network. –  Lars Aug 29 '11 at 15:33

I've used something called Gluster which allows for things like this. The situation I use it for is more for load balancing than for alternate content distribution.

Also, sites like Stack Overflow use Content Distribution Network services for certain pieces of information on their site. A solution like this might actually be more cost effective than buying/setting up/maintaining a whole new server.

share|improve this answer
    
that looks like a very interesting project, thanks! –  Lars Aug 29 '11 at 19:32
    
+1 for Gluster, great solution. –  ceejayoz Aug 30 '11 at 17:56

May be you can mount the upload directory to your web server. Check Linux NFS

share|improve this answer

Don't know if this is the best way, but why not simply have the file server a separate subdomain? That way it can handle all of the file download minutia and you can connect to it via FTP or SFTP from the main server.

Basically, here is a process you could use:

  1. Point your subdomain at the secondary server. I found some information on that here.
  2. Have an upload form on your main server which processes and validates the file.
  3. When the file is deemed acceptable, send it to the other server via FTP or SFTP. If you can't get the PHP tools working for this, phpseclib might help. You may want to make this step multi-threaded.
share|improve this answer
    
Having this it will be overload on main server as all files uploaded through the application will be FTP to other server. End user will alsoface extra delay because file will be uploaded by him first goes to main server(he it will do database entry) then it will be FTP to file server. –  phpian Aug 26 '11 at 6:01

By using an url wrapper, you can use your default move_uploaded_file(), if your ftp server accepts this connection type. Alternatively, you can use PHP's ftp functions, especially ftp_put(), to upload the file to the server.

For content delivery, you need to have a database or other means to get the original url on the content distribution server and put the url in the html arguments:

<img src="http://cdn1.example.com/images/68263483.png" />
<a href="http://cdn2.example.com/files/9872345.pdf">Download PDF</a>

An example code to handle an uploaded files would be

<?php
// ...
$uploads_dir = 'images';
foreach ($_FILES["pictures"]["error"] as $key => $error) {
    if ($error == UPLOAD_ERR_OK) {
        $tmp_name = $_FILES["pictures"]["tmp_name"][$key];
        $name = $_FILES["pictures"]["name"][$key];
        move_uploaded_file($tmp_name, 
            "ftp://user:pass@cdn1.example.com/$uploads_dir/$name");

        // save url in your database for later retrieval ...
    }
}

or with ftp_put():

<?php
// ...
$ftpCon = ftp_connect('cdn1.example.com') 
    or die('Could not connect to ftp server');
$uploads_dir = 'images';
foreach ($_FILES["pictures"]["error"] as $key => $error) {
    if ($error == UPLOAD_ERR_OK) {
        $tmp_name = $_FILES["pictures"]["tmp_name"][$key];
        $name = $_FILES["pictures"]["name"][$key];
        ftp_put($ftpCon, "$uploads_dir/$name", $tmp_name)
            or die("could not upload $name to ftp server");
        // save url in your database for later retrieval ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer

if your application requires intensive read/write to the file server, then I would think it's a bad idea to separate it. maybe you can mirror the NFS to your main web server to reduce latency!

Use nginx to handle all request to static files (eg: css, images, javascript)

share|improve this answer
  1. Create a share on the file server to tbe directory where you want to download and upload files. Two shares if you plan to keep tyem in separate folders.

  2. Map the folders on the web server with the PHP code Base. Make sure you use a login to conect to the share(s) that will have read and write access.

  3. Once you have mapped the share(s), create a virtual directory on the website to the shared folder (this all depends on your web server).

  4. Check how PHP handles accessing files on a shared drive in a website, depending on your webserver it may be different than how you normally handle files.

I like this approach because the server OS handles transfering the files to and from the file server. PHP just handles telling it which files it needs.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.