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I have two different properties and hence two values. These properties are read and write properties. I have one method and I need to pass both property values to this one method. How to I accomplish this? Is using Array the only way to do this? Here is example:

In a Calculator example:

//Property 1
public int numberone
{
 get { return passnumberone; }
 set { passnumberone = Add(value);}
}
//Property 2
public int numbertwo
{
 get { return passnumbertwo; }
 set { passnumbertwo = Add(value);}
 }
//Method
private int Add(?)
{
int numberone
int numbertwo
int finalanswer
finalanswer = numberone + numbertwo
return finalanswer;
}
//Calling 
Calculator.numberone = 10;
Calculator.numbertwo = 12;

I know I could use the method only and pass these two number very easily. But I am trying to use the porperties.

Thanks in Advance!

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1  
Your question is very unclear. Why are the setters calling a method at all? What are you trying to achieve? Please read tinyurl.com/so-hints –  Jon Skeet Aug 19 '11 at 13:23
    
I appologize, I should be more clear. I am a beginner in c# programming and trying to understand the concept of encapsulation. I am using the Calculator example to pass two parameters to a method. –  Shazam Aug 19 '11 at 14:01
    
I have two classes, First one calls the second as an object. The second one has two properties and a method. I know there are easier ways to handle this particular example of adding two numbers. But I am trying to understand how to pass two paramters to a method. –  Shazam Aug 19 '11 at 14:03
    
"First one calls the second as an object" doesn't make sense. Please try to be very precise in what you're saying. Passing two arguments to a method is easy, but it's much hard to work out what you're trying to achieve. –  Jon Skeet Aug 19 '11 at 14:09
    
Let me give it another try - I have two classes, similar to what deepee1 is stating in his answer. First class has input values. Second class conducts the calculator operation or addition. I pass the values (numbers) to the second class, which has the two properties and a method (see my example above). –  Shazam Aug 19 '11 at 14:15
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You will have to pass the object that contains the properties to the method if the object is not the same as the one that contains the Add method.

class CalculatorInputs
{
  public int numberone;
  public int numbertwo;
}

class CalculatorOperations
{
  public int Add(CalculatorInputs input)
  {
    return input.numberone + input.numbertwo;
  }

}
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You can pass both values to the method as parameters:

private int Add(int numberone, int numbertwo)
{
    int finalanswer
    finalanswer = numberone + numbertwo
    return finalanswer;
}

Then you would call it like this:

int answer = this.Add(numberone, numbertwo);

But to be honest your first question contradicts your second, also, you shouldn't be calling this everytime you set a number, seems kind of confusing to me, and there's probably a better way to do it, but I'm insure of what you're trying to achieve.

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Since you are setting the properties beforehand calling the method, you don't have to pass anything to the method.

private int Add()
{
    int finalanswer;
    finalanswer = this.numberone + this.numbertwo
    return finalanswer;
}

and you can call

Calculator c = new Calculator();
c.numberOne = 10;
c.numberTwo = 12;
int sum = c.Add();
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I am not sure what you are upto here but in any case you would be needing a Third property which will actually give you the Added value;

So need of calling the Add method at all

public int AddedNumber
{
 get { return passnumberone + passnumbertwo ; } 
}

If this is not what you intend then please expand and add more details to your question.

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