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We all love REST, especially when it comes to the development of APIs. Doing so for the last years I always stumble upon the same problem: nested resources. It seems we're living at the two edges of a scale. Let me introduce an example.

/galaxies/8/solarsystems/5/planets/1/continents/4/countries.json

Neato. Cases like that seem to happen everywhere, no matter in what shape they materialize. Now I'd like to being able to fetch all the countries in a solar system while being able to fetch countries deeply scoped as shown above.

It seems I have two choices here. The first one, I flatten my nested structure and introduce a lot of GET parameters (that need to be well documented and understood by my API user) like so:

/countries.json?galaxy=8&solarsystem=5&planet=1&continent=4

I could flatten all my resources like so and won a unique endpoint base URL for each one. Good point … unique endpoints per resource!

But what's the price? Something that does not feel natural, is not discoverable and does not behave like the tree structure below my resources. Conclusion: Bad idea, but well practiced.

On the other hand I could try to get rid of as many additional GET parameters as possible, creating endpoints like that:

/galaxies/8/solarsystems/5/countries.json

But I also needed:

/galaxies/8/solarsystems/5/planets/1/continents/4/countries.json

This seems to be the other side of the scale. Least number of additional GET parameters, more natural behave but still not what I expected as an API user.

The most APIs I worked with in the last year follow the one or the other paradigm. It seems there is at least one bullet to bite. So why not doing the following:

If there are resources that nest naturally, lets nest them exactly in the way we'd expect them to be nested. What we achive is at first a unique endpoint for every resource when we stay like that:

/galaxies.json
/galaxies/8/solarsystems.json
/galaxies/8/solarsystems/5/planets.json
/galaxies/8/solarsystems/5/planets/1/continents.json
/galaxies/8/solarsystems/5/planets/1/continents/4/countries.json

Ok, but how to solve the initial problem, I wanted to fetch all the countries in a solar system while still being able to fetch countries fully scoped under galaxies, solar systems, planets and continents? Here's what feels natural for me:

/galaxies/8/solarsystems/5/planets/0/continents/0/countries.json # give me all countries in the solarsystem 5
/galaxies/8/solarsystems/0/planets/0/continents/0/countries.json # give me all countries in the galaxy 8

… and so on, and so on. Now you may argue "ok, but the zero there ….." and you are right. Does not look really nice. So why not change the two upper calls to something like that:

/galaxies/8/solarsystems/5/planets/all/continents/all/countries.json # give me all countries in the solarsystem 5
/galaxies/8/solarsystems/all/planets/all/continents/all/countries.json # give me all countries in the galaxy 8

Neat eh? So what do we achive? No additional GET parameters and still stable base URLs for each resources endpoint. What's the price? Yep, at least longer URLs especially during testing by hand using tools like curl.

I wonder wether this could be a way to improve not only the maintainability but also the ease of use of APIs. If so, why does not anyone take an approach like that. I can not imagine to be the first one having that idea. So there must be valid counter arguments against an approach like that. I don't see any. Do you?

I would really like to hear your opinion and arguments for or against an approach like that. Maybe there are ideas for improvement … would be great to hear from you. In my opinion this could lead to much better structured APIs, so hopefully someone will read that and reply.

Regards. Jan

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2 Answers 2

Nested resource URLs are usually bad. The approach I generally take is to use unique IDs.

Design your DB so that it is only going to have one continent with ID 4. Then, instead of the horrible /galaxies/8/solarsystems/5/planets/1/continents/4/countries.json, all you need is the simple /continents/4/countries.json. Clear, sufficient, and memorable.

The :shallow routing option in Rails does this automatically.

For "all countries in a solar system", I'd use /solar_systems/5/countries.json -- that is, don't try to shoehorn it into the generic URL scheme. (And note the underscore.)

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Marnen, thanks for your thoughts. Using unique ID's seems obvious but is not always possible. In most cases the use of numerical ID's is unwanted due to different but numerous reasons. Therefore ID clashes can happen so that completely flatten all nested resources becomes a noop. In Addition what do you do in case your API users want (have) to scope the returned results in more detail? –  Jason Nerer Aug 19 '11 at 15:59
    
You're back with the same pain in the arse, additional GET parameters or different enpoint base URL's for the same resource. On the other hand your approach seems not natural. If I tried to discover your API service via CURL, I needed to read a lot of docs to understand. With the following posts in mind (blog.steveklabnik.com/2011/08/07/… and blog.steveklabnik.com/2011/07/03/…) I'd like to simplify the use of an API. Shallow routing in Rails3 is something I did not discover yet. Will do so and rethink. –  Jason Nerer Aug 19 '11 at 16:00
    
@Jason: "Using unique ID's seems obvious but is not always possible." Wrong. It is always possible -- and desirable -- to give every object a unique ID. This is axiomatic to DB design. If you can't give every object a unique ID, then you haven't normalized your data model properly. • "In most cases the use of numerical ID's is unwanted due to different but numerous reasons." Then the IDs don't have to be numeric. But they do have to be unique. • "On the other hand your approach seems not natural." What's not natural about it? To me, it seems extremely natural. –  Marnen Laibow-Koser Aug 27 '11 at 21:01
    
@Jason: "additional GET parameters or different enpoint base URL's for the same resource." Nope. My suggestion gives each resource its own URL. • "If I tried to discover your API service via CURL, I needed to read a lot of docs to understand." Of course. That's true with any reasonably complex API. I don't see how discoverability can possibly work for any but the very simplest data. As an API consumer, it's my job to read docs. • "Shallow routing in Rails3 is something I did not discover yet." Shallow routing has been around since Rails 2, if not earlier. Sounds like you need more study. –  Marnen Laibow-Koser Aug 27 '11 at 21:06

It would all depend on upon how the data is presented. Would the user really need to the know the galaxy # to find a specific country? If so them what you propose makes sense. However, it seems to me that what you are proposing, while structured and presented well, doesn't allow for clients to search for child element unless the parent is a known quantity.

In your example, if I had a specific id for a continent I would need to know the planet, solar system and galaxy as well. In order to find the specific continent I would need to get all for each possible parent until I found the continent.

Presenting structured data in this manner if fine. Using this structure when you only have a piece of the data may be a bit cumbersome. It all depends upon what you are trying to accomplish.

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Ken, I see your point. Id's of continents do not have to be unique, they become unique in their scope (of planets, solarsystems and galaxies), right. In the case you describe I'd have to request the continents representation like so: /galaxies/all/solarsystems/all/planets/all/continents/:id.json. Since I'm requesting a singular resource this feels natural at least for me. In fact I agree with you, it depends on the use case. But don't you think, that the price to pay (requests like the one in this comment) is worth the win? –  Jason Nerer Aug 19 '11 at 14:27

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