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Say I have something like this in a C Code. I know you can use a #define instead, to make the compiler not compile it, but just out of curiosity I'm asking if the compiler will also figure this thing out.

I think this is even more important for Java Compiler as it does not support #define.

const int CONDITION = 0;
........
// Will the compiler compile this?
if ( CONDITION )
{

}
.......
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11  
Why don't you try it, and look at the resulting binary? –  Oliver Charlesworth Aug 19 '11 at 14:06
2  
Specifically, you can use the javap -c command on your Class to print out the bytecode, which is actually pretty easy to read. download.oracle.com/javase/1,5.0/docs/tooldocs/windows/… –  Brigham Aug 19 '11 at 14:11
1  
I remember seeing if (false) { ... } as a recommended way of excluding code in Java, à la #if in the C preprocessor. That was several years ago. –  Joe Aug 19 '11 at 14:16
1  
@Joe And I never understood that appeal. On any modern IDE commenting out several lines of code is faster than writing the if() AND it is clearer. Awful habit imo - only necessary if one doesn't have a good IDE at hand. –  Voo Aug 19 '11 at 14:25
2  
@Voo - what if you have lots of blocks that should be disabled together, maybe distributed across all classes? Just changing the value of one constant surely will be faster and less error prone. (but I also dislike the idea) –  Carlos Heuberger Aug 19 '11 at 14:36

7 Answers 7

up vote 14 down vote accepted

in Java, the code inside the if won't even be part of the compiled code. It must compile, but it won't be written to the compiled bytecode. It actually depends on the compiler, but I don't know of a compiler that doesn't optimize it. the rules are defined in the JLS:

An optimizing compiler may realize that the statement x=3; will never be executed and may choose to omit the code for that statement from the generated class file, but the statement x=3; is not regarded as "unreachable" in the technical sense specified here.

The rationale for this differing treatment is to allow programmers to define "flag variables" such as:

static final boolean DEBUG = false;

and then write code such as:

if (DEBUG) { x=3; }

The idea is that it should be possible to change the value of DEBUG from false to true or from true to false and then compile the code correctly with no other changes to the program text.

Don't know about C.

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First off, Java doesn't allow non-boolean in conditionals like C (if, while etc.). Also, if you have a "constant" expression" in your if checks, the compiler will warn you that you are comparing identical expressions so I'm sure it's optimized out. E.g.

    final int i = 1;
    if (1 == i) { // warning
        System.out.println("HI");
    }
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This code only generates a warning ("dead code", Java 6) if i is not 1! –  Carlos Heuberger Aug 19 '11 at 15:23

Instead of asking such simple questions (where the only correct answer is "Try it out with your compiler") - why not just try it?

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        if (true) {
            System.out.println("Yep");
        }
        boolean var = false;
        if (var) {
            System.out.println("Nope");
        }
        final boolean var2 = false;
        if (var2) {
            System.out.println("Nope");
        }
    }
}

javac .\Test.java 
javap -c Test
Compiled from "Test.java"
public class Test {
  public Test();
    Code:
       0: aload_0
       1: invokespecial #1                  // Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
       4: return

  public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
    Code:
       0: getstatic     #2                  // Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
       3: ldc           #3                  // String Yep
       5: invokevirtual #4                  // Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(Ljava/lang/String;)V
       8: iconst_0
       9: istore_1
      10: iload_1
      11: ifeq          22
      14: getstatic     #2                  // Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
      17: ldc           #3                  // String Yep
      19: invokevirtual #4                  // Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(Ljava/lang/String;)V
      22: return
}

You don't need to know much about java/c# bytecode or assembly to be able to understand what's going on. And now go and try the same for C#..

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I just did a quick check with the following piece of code

public class Test {
    private static final boolean flag = true;

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {

        if(flag){
            System.out.println("1");
            System.out.println("1");
            System.out.println("1");
            System.out.println("1");
            System.out.println("1");
            System.out.println("1");
            System.out.println("1");
            System.out.println("1");
            System.out.println("1");        
        }

    }

}

when flag = true , the resulting class file size is 708

when flag = false. resulting class file size is 462

which implies that compile surely does optimization for static final values

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Did this with standard JDK 1.6 –  Santosh Aug 19 '11 at 14:24
1  
Reproduced this on GCC 4.4.5 (C code) and it has a similar outcome. –  Jonathon Aug 19 '11 at 14:26

I can recall scenarios in my Java and C# programs, where it did (optimize it out). But I also know it depends very much on the compiler settings - therefore the scenario is too unspecific.

In a Java scenario we had the const values in one Java source file, while they were used in another class (file). What happened was, when we just changed and recompiled the file with the const values, nothing changed in the flow of the using parts. We had to recompile the whole project (which is the proof it was optimized out).

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Below is specific to C language. I don't know how Java handles it.

Since int is defined as a const, if (i) becomes a no-op instruction here. A smart compiler should be able to optimize away that empty if statement.

Example: VC 2008

A non-empty {} with if statement:

const int i = 1;
// mov dword ptr [i], 1
if (i)
// mov eax, 1
// test eax, eax
// je wmain+35h
{
   int j = 2;
   // move dword ptr [j], 2
}
// ..

Empty {} with if statement:

const int i = 1;
// mov dword ptr [i], 1
if (i)
{
}
// ..
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A java compiler must detect obviously unreachable code, that's a language requirement. So the following code will compile without errors:

static final boolean flag = true; 

public static void main(String[] args) {
    final String msg;
    if (flag)
        msg = "true";
    if (!flag)
        msg = "false";
    System.out.println(msg);
}

Note that msg is final but the compiler does neither complain that msg is not initialized nor does it complain that it gets initialized twice. Most compilers will not write dead code to the class file. But even if, the JIT will optimize it away.

C++ also has a notion of compile time constants. A const int is a compile time constant, so it can be used as a nontype template argument for example. So every sane C++ compiler will detect and optimize away obviously dead code of this type, even if you compile without specifying optimization options.

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