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I'm having a hard time trying to implement this method since array subscripts in C++ start with zero. The method add one element to the queue. You can use f (front) and r (rear) pointers and a sequential list of size n. If you find that additional variables are needed fell free. Thanks.

Thats my try but I know its wrong:

void QueueAr::enqueue(const Object& x){
    prov = (r % n) + 1;
    if(prov != f){
        r = prov;
        queueArray[r] = x;
        if(f = -1){
            f = 0
        }
    }else{
        //queue is full
    }
}

How do I work with the pointers? If I start them pointing to NULL I cant use pointer arithmetic.

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Are you allowed to use STL? Or are you using plain arrays? –  strager Apr 3 '09 at 1:48
    
In your example, what are prov, r, f, and n? Can you post the body of your class? –  strager Apr 3 '09 at 1:56
    
I'm using a list allocated with list* Object = new Object[10] for example. I need it to work with this. –  brsunli Apr 3 '09 at 1:56
    
In case this is a programming assignment, please consider finding the answers in your course material instead of taking shortcuts by getting the answer on SO. –  lothar Apr 6 '09 at 2:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To implement a queue using plain arrays, just treat it circularly - so as soon as you run out of space in the array, wrap back around to 0. You'll need to keep a record of front and rear, as you note. As an example (where X represents an item in the queue):

// Rear is where to enqueue into, Front is where to dequeue from
Empty Array:
| - - - |
Front = -1, Rear = 0 

Enqueue()
| X - - |
Front = 0, Rear = 1

Enqueue()
| X X - |
Front = 0, Rear = 2

Dequeue()
| - X - |
Front = 1, Rear = 2

Enqueue()
| - X X |
Front = 1, Rear = 0 // Looped around

Dequeue()
| - - X |
Front = 2, Rear = 0

Enqueue()
| X - X |
Front = 2, Rear = 1

You just have to use modular arithmetic to wrap around. Of course, this is limited in size (once you run out of elements, you'd have to allocate more memory), but that's just what you get when dealing with arrays.

Here's some code as a start (I haven't checked it at all):

// Private class variables:
// These should be set in the constructor of your queue class
unsigned int rear = 0; // back of the queue
unsigned int front = -1; // front of the queue
unsigned int numStored = 0;
unsigned int length;
Object* array = new Object[length];

QueueAr::Enqueue(Object& obj)
{
    if (front == rear)
    {
        // Throw an exception: queue is full!
    }
    else
    {
        array[rear] = obj; // Insert the object at the back
        rear++;
        rear = rear % length;
        numStored++;
    }
}
// For kicks, here's the queue code
QueueAr::Dequeue(Object& obj)
{
    if (numStored == 0)
    {
        // Throw an exception: queue is empty!
    }
    front++;
    front = front % length;
    numStored--;
}
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Help me with my modular arithmetic expression. The one I have right now it's wrong cuz at the end r will get a higher value then array size. –  brsunli Apr 3 '09 at 2:04
    
The modular arithmetic expression is now shown in my example code - it's the line that says "rear = rear % length" - I think you could do rear %= length too. –  Smashery Apr 3 '09 at 2:09
    
Don't you need to also change the front value if rear = 0? Cuz when the queue has only 1 element front and rear need to point to it. –  brsunli Apr 3 '09 at 2:14
    
Ok I got it now. Thank you. –  brsunli Apr 3 '09 at 2:19

If you're not using STL, you may want to use a linked list. To enqueue, add to the end of the list. To dequeue, remove from the beginning of the list. You should store pointers for either end of the list for performance and convenience.

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I know how to do that, I need it to work on a sequential list. –  brsunli Apr 3 '09 at 1:53

If you're restricted to a specific array size, you can implement a queue easily using a plain ol' C array. You need two pointers/indexes: the beginning of the queue and the end of the queue. You also need the array itself.

You can prevent your queue from overflowing by either (1) wrapping, or (2) copying the array when you reach the end. Either method is rather trivial, but wrapping is easier and faster. Wrapping your data elements is called using a circular buffer, and is common for queues and audio buffers.

Queue:  0 1 4 3 6 8 0 0 0 0 0
Start:      ^
End:                ^

Dequeue: return 4 (read, then move start to right)
Queue:  0 1 4 3 6 8 0 0 0 0 0
Start:        ^
End:                ^

Enqueue: 9 (write, then move end to right)
Queue:  0 1 4 3 6 8 9 0 0 0 0
Start:        ^
End:                  ^

Wrapping enqueue: 2 (write, then move to right and wrap to beginning)
Queue:  0 1 4 3 6 8 9 3 4 7 2
Start:        ^
End:    ^
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