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I have rewritten a computation library to improve memory management and have discovered that this has resulted in a speed increase. In the original it uses an array whose members are 12 doubles (so 96 bytes) apart in memory, whereas my array is contiguous.

How much of a speed increase would this difference provide?

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Aren't arrays allocated in contiguous memory locations? What are non contiguous arrays? BTW, which language are you using? –  Devendra D. Chavan Aug 19 '11 at 14:57
    
I wrote a wrapper for some fortran routines that provided the array memory. As for "non-contiguous arrays" - say in C you would have char array[50][50]. This is essentially 50 arrays of 50 bytes. The point being is accessing the first element from each of the 50 arrays slower than accessing all elements of the first array? (This is an analogue to what is happening in the fortran). And please note, I'm not writing the accessing routine that's pure fortran. –  VolatileStorm Aug 19 '11 at 15:04
    
In case of a 2 dimensional array with size as (m,n), the memory offset of (i,j) is done as follows, memOffset(i,j) = sizeOf(arrElement) * ((m-i)*n + j). Whereas in as of a 1 dimensional array it is memOffset(i) = sizeOf(arrElement) * i. So the decrease in performance is non existent. –  Devendra D. Chavan Aug 19 '11 at 15:18
    
If we're incrementing i, though, when accessing the element we have to multiply by n. And you're saying this doesn't carry any overhead? Maybe it's not noticable in comparison with the read? –  VolatileStorm Aug 19 '11 at 15:33
    
Well, you are comparing the performance of sizeOfElement * i and sizeOf(arrElement) * ((m-i)*n + j) or k * i vs k * ((m-i)*n + j). I suppose, unless you are running this on a slow or overloaded system, I would hardly make a difference. Are you running the code on a PC or another device? From a PC's point of view, the performance difference is negligible. –  Devendra D. Chavan Aug 19 '11 at 15:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I have created a small test program that calculates the array element access times for 1D and 2D arrays. It is a Console application in C# .NET built in Release mode (with optimizations enabled). If the size of the 1D array is m then the size of the 2D array is m x m.

public class PhysicsCalculator
{
    public const Int32 ArrayDimension = 1000;

    public long CalculateSingleDimensionPerformance()
    {
        var arr = new double[ArrayDimension];

        var stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
        stopwatch.Start();

        for (Int32 i = 0; i < ArrayDimension; i++)
        {
            arr[i] = i;
        }

        stopwatch.Stop();

        return stopwatch.ElapsedTicks;
    }

    public long CalculateDoubleDimensionPerformance()
    {
        var arr = new double[ArrayDimension, ArrayDimension];

        var stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
        stopwatch.Start();

        for (Int32 i = 0; i < ArrayDimension; i++)
        {
            arr[i, 5] = i;
        }

        stopwatch.Stop();

        return stopwatch.ElapsedTicks;
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var physicsCalculator = new PhysicsCalculator();

        // This is a dummy call to tell the runtime to jit the methods before hand (to avoid jitting on first call)
        physicsCalculator.CalculateSingleDimensionPerformance();
        physicsCalculator.CalculateDoubleDimensionPerformance();

        Console.WriteLine("Number of ticks per seconds = " + new TimeSpan(0, 0, 1).Ticks);
        Console.WriteLine();

        const int numberOfRepetetions = 1000;
        long elapsedTicks = 0;

        for (var i = 0; i < numberOfRepetetions; i++)
        {
            elapsedTicks += physicsCalculator.CalculateSingleDimensionPerformance();
        }

        Console.WriteLine("1D array : ");
        GenerateReport(elapsedTicks, numberOfRepetetions);

        elapsedTicks = 0;
        for (var i = 0; i < numberOfRepetetions; i++)
        {
            elapsedTicks += physicsCalculator.CalculateDoubleDimensionPerformance();
        }

        Console.WriteLine("2D array : ");
        GenerateReport(elapsedTicks, numberOfRepetetions);

        // Wait before exit
        Console.Read();
    }

    private static void GenerateReport(long elapsedTicks, int numberOfRepetetions)
    {
        var oneSecond = new TimeSpan(0, 0, 1);

        Console.WriteLine("Array size = " + PhysicsCalculator.ArrayDimension);
        Console.WriteLine("Ticks (avg) = " + elapsedTicks / numberOfRepetetions);
        Console.WriteLine("Ticks (for {0} repetitions) = {1}", numberOfRepetetions, elapsedTicks);
        Console.WriteLine("Time taken (avg) = {0} ms", (elapsedTicks * oneSecond.TotalMilliseconds) / (numberOfRepetetions * oneSecond.Ticks));
        Console.WriteLine("Time taken (for {0} repetitions) = {1} ms", numberOfRepetetions,
           (elapsedTicks * oneSecond.TotalMilliseconds) / oneSecond.Ticks);

        Console.WriteLine();
    }
}

The results on my machine (2.8 GHz Phenom II quad core, 8 GB DDR2 800 MHz RAM, Windows 7 Ultimate x64) are

Number of ticks per seconds = 10000000

1D array : Array size = 1000 
Ticks (avg) = 52 
Ticks (for 1000 repetitions) = 52598 
Time taken (avg) = 0.0052598 ms 
Time taken (for 1000 repetitions) = 5.2598 ms

2D array : Array size = 1000 
Ticks (avg) = 13829
Ticks (for 1000 repetitions) = 13829984 
Time taken (avg) = 1.3829984 ms 
Time taken (for 1000 repetitions) = 1382.9984 ms

Interestingly, the results are quite clear, the access times for 2D array elements is significantly greater than those for 1D array elements.


Determining whether time taken is a function of array size

  • For array size of 100
Number of ticks per seconds = 10000000

1D array : 
Array size = 100
Ticks (avg) = 20
Ticks (for 1000 repetitions) = 20552
Time taken (avg) = 0.0020552 ms
Time taken (for 1000 repetitions) = 2.0552 ms

2D array : 
Array size = 100
Ticks (avg) = 326
Ticks (for 1000 repetitions) = 326039
Time taken (avg) = 0.0326039 ms
Time taken (for 1000 repetitions) = 32.6039 ms
  • For array size of 20
Number of ticks per seconds = 10000000

1D array : 
Array size = 20
Ticks (avg) = 16
Ticks (for 1000 repetitions) = 16653
Time taken (avg) = 0.0016653 ms
Time taken (for 1000 repetitions) = 1.6653 ms

2D array : 
Array size = 20
Ticks (avg) = 21
Ticks (for 1000 repetitions) = 21147
Time taken (avg) = 0.0021147 ms
Time taken (for 1000 repetitions) = 2.1147 ms
  • For array size of 12 (your use case)
Number of ticks per seconds = 10000000

1D array : 
Array size = 12
Ticks (avg) = 16
Ticks (for 1000 repetitions) = 16548
Time taken (avg) = 0.0016548 ms
Time taken (for 1000 repetitions) = 1.6548 ms

2D array : 
Array size = 12
Ticks (avg) = 20
Ticks (for 1000 repetitions) = 20762
Time taken (avg) = 0.0020762 ms
Time taken (for 1000 repetitions) = 2.0762 ms

As you can see, the array size does make a difference in the element access time. But, in your use case of array size as 12, the difference is about (0.0016548 ms for 1D vs 0.0020762 ms for 2D) 25% i.e. 1D access is 25% faster than 2D access.


When the lower array size is smaller in case of 2D array

In the above samples, if the size of the 1D array is m then the size of the 2D array is m x m. When the size of the 2D array is reduced to m x 2, I get the following results for m = 12

1D array : 
Array size = 12
Ticks (avg) = 16
Ticks (for 1000 repetitions) = 16100
Time taken (avg) = 0.00161 ms
Time taken (for 1000 repetitions) = 1.61 ms

2D array : 
Array size = 12 x 2
Ticks (avg) = 16
Ticks (for 1000 repetitions) = 16324
Time taken (avg) = 0.0016324 ms
Time taken (for 1000 repetitions) = 1.6324 ms

In this case, the difference is hardly 1.3%.

To gauge the performance in your system, I would suggest that you convert the above code in FORTRAN and run the benchmarks with actual values.

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Hmmm, this is a MASSIVE difference, I have to admit - that's larger than I was expecting. Could this be put down to compiler optimisation? Also, how much of the difference can be put down to the array size? I.e. how does the ratio of the 2Dticks to 1Dticks behave as a function of "ArrayDimension". (In my situation Array dimension would be 12) Apologies that I'm asking for more tests, I'm not a C# developer, and I'm a linux user. Thanks greatly! –  VolatileStorm Aug 20 '11 at 9:40
    
The code runs in .NET so it a managed environment as compared with the native C/C++. And the results are for the optimized build. I will have to check whether the access time is a function of the array size. I will need some more information about the system on which you are comparing the performance, like CPU, RAM, OS, compiler, and the data type (Int32/Int16/etc.) that you are using as the array indexer. –  Devendra D. Chavan Aug 21 '11 at 2:38
    
Well as previously stated, the code is in fortran, and therefore the index will just be a standard fortran integer, and it's a fortran array of doubles. As for the actual system, I couldn't tell you in all honesty. I'm running the code by ssh-ing onto a collection of linux servers. They're all running SLC5 (that's scientific linux). Compiler is simply either GCC 4.1.2 or 4.3.3 at the moment. I hope that's helpful. –  VolatileStorm Aug 21 '11 at 12:43
    
I have added the results that determine whether array access time determines the array element access time. It seems that larger the array size the slower the access time. –  Devendra D. Chavan Aug 22 '11 at 16:18
    
I suspect that inside the 2D test function, most of the time was spent on initializing (zeroing) the array, thus doing 1024x times as much work compared to the 1D test function. Perhaps a sampling profiler should be used to see where the time is spent. –  rwong Aug 25 '12 at 5:12

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