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I'm writing a basic HTTP client and have ran into a problem - some HTTP servers are forcing resets, causing a "Connection reset by peer" error. Many HTTP servers do close the connection gracefully, though none seem to keep the connection alive.

However, I'm sure it's my client because HTTP clients using very similar source code don't exhibit the same behaviour: their connections to the same servers are either closed gracefully or kept alive.

What is causing this seemingly inconsistent problem?

Relevant code:

/* socket */
if ((context->socket = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, IPPROTO_TCP)) == -1) {
    perror("Failed to create socket");
    exit(-1);
}

/* connect */
if (connect(context->socket, &context->tx_addr, sizeof(struct sockaddr)) != 0) {
    perror("Couldn't connect to server");
    exit(-1);
}

/* create header */
snprintf(context->packet, BUFF_SIZE,
         "GET %s HTTP/1.1\r\n" \
         "Host: %s\r\n\r\n", 
         conf->request, conf->host);

/* send header */
if ((sendto(context->socket, context->packet, BUFF_SIZE, 0, 
            NULL, 0))) != BUFF_SIZE) {
    perror("Failed to send");
    exit(-1);
}

/* receive response */
do {
    if ((received = recvfrom(context->socket, context->packet, BUFF_SIZE, 0, NULL, 
                             NULL)) < 0) {

        /* THIS is where RST occurs with some servers */

        perror("Failed to receive");
        exit(-1)
    }

    if (received >= 0)     
            context->packet[received] = '\0';
    printf("%s", context->packet);

} while (received > 0);
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

After some investigation, it became apparent that my HTTP requests were malformed.

The problem lies in this code:

/* create header */
snprintf(context->packet, BUFF_SIZE,
         "GET %s HTTP/1.1\r\n" \
         "Host: %s\r\n\r\n", 
         conf->request, conf->host);

/* send header */
if ((sendto(context->socket, context->packet, BUFF_SIZE, 0, 
            NULL, 0)) != BUFF_SIZE) {
    perror("Failed to send entire buffer");
    exit(-1);
}

Notice that BUFF_SIZE bytes from the buffer are sent, even though we almost certainly won't fill the entire buffer when creating the header with snprintf. The garbage proceeding the generated header was also being transmitted. Some servers just ignored the bad request, others just gave up and reset (RST) the connection.

Simply change the send code to something like this to fix the problem:

/* assuming context->packet is a string */
int len = strlen(context->packet);
int sent = 0, total = 0;

while (total < len) {
    if ((sent = sendto(context->socket, context->packet + total, 
                       len - total, 0, NULL, 0)) <= 0) {
        perror("Failed to send");
        exit(-1);
    }
    total += sent;
}
share|improve this answer
    
sendto(...) != BUF_SIZE is wrong. First, you are now sending less than that. Second, TCP might buffer less then you give it to send. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Aug 19 '11 at 15:29
    
If I'm not mistaken, it's depends on flags. That is, without any flags sendto will block until the requested amount is sent like write() does. –  TimCinel Aug 19 '11 at 17:01
1  
No, it writes to whatever space is available in socket's send buffer and returns. You might not see this in simple cases, but under heavier traffic short writes do occur. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Aug 19 '11 at 17:14
1  
You're both right, sort of. sendto will block, but there's no guarantee it won't return before writing the whole request, eg. if a signal handler is invoked. Btw, there's not point to use sendto with TCP. It usually more simple (and more portable) to use send or the general write function. –  Per Johansson Aug 19 '11 at 17:35
    
Nikolai N Fetissov and Per Johansson : I appreciate the feedback. –  TimCinel Aug 20 '11 at 6:19

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