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Using variadic template arguments together with a simple template argument I have experienced some strange behaviour of is_base_of when it was instantiated from a binded functor.

Here is the code:

template <class T, class Index>
class Base{};

template<typename T>
struct Checker {
    typedef int result_type;

    // Returns 1 if a given T type is descendant of Base<T,First>
    template<typename First, typename ...Args>
    result_type operator()(First&& first, Args&&... params)
    {
        return check(std::is_base_of<Base<T,First>, T>(),
                std::forward<First>(first),
                std::forward<Args>(params)...);
    }
    template<typename ...Args>
    result_type check(const std::true_type&, Args&&... params)
    {
        return 1;
    }
    template<typename ...Args>
    result_type check(const std::false_type&, Args&&... params)
    {
        return 0;
    }
};

struct A {};
struct B : Base<B,int> {};

int main()
{
    Checker<A> ch1;
    std::cout<<ch1(3.14)<<std::endl;
    Checker<B> ch2;
    std::cout<<ch2(1 ,3.14)<<std::endl; // output is 1
    std::cout<<std::bind(ch2, 1, 3.14)()<<std::endl; // output is 0 but it should be 1 !
    return 0;
}

The program output is:

0
1
0

But I would expect:

0
1
1

Am I using the variadic templates in a wrong way? Is there any other (correct) way to get the first type of a variadic type list like Args? Why this is a problem only when it is used with the bind expression?

Note, if I am modifing the Base template to have only one template parameter, then the bind expression works:

template <class T>
class Base{};

template<typename T>
struct Checker {
    typedef int result_type;

    // Returns 1 if a given T type is descendant of Base<T>
    template<typename ...Args>
    result_type operator()(Args&&... params)
    {
        return check(std::is_base_of<Base<T>, T>(),
                std::forward<Args>(params)...);
    }
    template<typename ...Args>
    result_type check(const std::true_type&, Args&&... params)
    {
        return 1;
    }
    template<typename ...Args>
    result_type check(const std::false_type&, Args&&... params)
    {
        return 0;
    }
};

struct A {};
struct B : Base<B> {};

int main()
{
    Checker<A> ch1;
    std::cout<<ch1(3.14)<<std::endl;
    Checker<B> ch2;
    std::cout<<ch2(3.14)<<std::endl; // output is 1
    std::cout<<std::bind(ch2, 3.14)()<<std::endl; // output is 1 this time!
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
May I ask why you are implementing this as functions instead of meta-functions? Involving a value seems completely unnecessary when all checks could be done at compile time. –  pmr Aug 21 '11 at 0:36

2 Answers 2

You're not getting the expected output because the data-type of First in your Checker function object when called after std::bind() is of type int&, not int.

Therefore std::is_base_of<Base<B,int&>, B> does not instantiate to a std::true_type for the call to Checker::check.

The problem is that std::bind is creating an object that internally stores the arguments for the function you are passing to it. Therefore there is a named l-value as a non-static data-member of the object returned by std::bind that is holding the value you passed as an argument to be bound to your function. When that non-static data-member is then passed to the r-value reference at the time you call the operator() of the functor, it's passed as an l-value reference, since it is no longer a temporary object. You would have a similar problem if you did something like:

int x = 1;
Checker<B> ch2;
std::cout<<ch2(x, 3.14)<<std::endl;

The named-value x is an l-value, and would be passed to the first argument in your operator() method as an l-value reference, not as temporary, since first is a r-value reference. Therefore your type would end up again as an int& and not an int, and you'd print a value of 0.

To fix this problem, you can do something like:

template<typename First, typename ...Args>
result_type operator()(First&& first, Args&&... params)
{
   if (std::is_reference<First>::value)
    {
        return check(std::is_base_of<Base<T, typename std::remove_reference<First>::type>, T>(),
            std::forward<First>(first),
            std::forward<Args>(params)...);
    }
    else
    {
        return check(std::is_base_of<Base<T,First>, T>(),
            std::forward<First>(first),
            std::forward<Args>(params)...);
    }
}

This will strip off the reference-type of the object and give you the results you want.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that is indeed true. But is there a way to somehow pass it as int, instead of int& ? –  Gabor Marton Aug 19 '11 at 16:39
    
And why and how it became int& instead of int ? –  Gabor Marton Aug 19 '11 at 17:04
    
See my answer update. –  Jason Aug 19 '11 at 18:25
    
Thank you Jason, it helped a lot. –  Gabor Marton Aug 21 '11 at 0:12
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Unfortunately std::is_reference did not give me the expected result on a more complicated issue. So finally I choosed providing the reference and const-reference overloads:

template<typename First, typename ...Args>
result_type operator()(First& first, Args&&... params)
{
    return check(std::is_base_of<Base<T,First>, T>(),
            first,
            std::forward<Args>(params)...);
}
template<typename First, typename ...Args>
result_type operator()(const First& first, Args&&... params)
{
    return check(std::is_base_of<Base<T,First>, T>(),
            first,
            std::forward<Args>(params)...);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm curious to know, what were the unexpected results? –  Jason Aug 21 '11 at 18:59
    
BTW, keep in mind that a const lvalue reference will not bind to a non-constant rvale reference, so without a specific overload for that type, you would not be capable of passing a const lvalue argument without causing a compiler error. Only constant rvalue references can have anything bound to them. –  Jason Aug 21 '11 at 19:06

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