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I have a questionaire; there are no right or wrong answers, simply "expert, intermediate, beginner" which have values 3,2,1.

The questions are split up into various groups, i.e. math, geography, etc. I have built a "content management system" that will allow the administrator to add groups as well as questions for each group, therefore I have an unknown number of questions and groups.

I tried and tried to write SQL to loop through the input but had no success. The only way I found to do it is in C# as follows;

logonName = Session["user"].ToString();

foreach (GridViewRow gvr in GridView1.Rows)
{
    var rb = gvr.FindControl("answers_list") as RadioButtonList;
    var quest = rb.SelectedValue;

    if (quest == "")
    {
        quest = "0";
    }

    var questId = GridView1.DataKeys[gvr.RowIndex].Values[0].ToString();
    var gpId = GridView1.DataKeys[gvr.RowIndex].Values[1].ToString();
    int questionId = Convert.ToInt32(questId);
    int groupId = Convert.ToInt32(gpId);
    int question = Convert.ToInt32(quest);
    var objDB01 = new dbconn();
    const string strSQL = "insertResults";
    objDB01.objCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue("@userId", logonName);
    objDB01.objCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue("@groupId", groupId);
    objDB01.objCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue("@questionId", questionId);
    objDB01.objCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue("@answer", question);

    try
    {
        objDB01.GetNonQuery(strSQL);
    }
    finally
    {
        objDB01.Dispose();
    }
}

Is there a more efficient way to do this? What kind of stress is this putting on the server as once this is rolled out, there could be hundred of users answering hundreds of questions simultaneously?

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Ken White, bmargulies, Kev Aug 21 '11 at 14:02

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Without seeing your SQL query(s) and the tables used it's a bit hard to speculate. Maybe you could add more detail then flag to re-open. –  Kev Aug 21 '11 at 14:02
    
How do I re-open a question? I am simply asking if looping through the above code dozens of times, opening and closing the database connection each time is poor programming. I am interested in the comments on LINQ as I have not used that, working in an environment where it was .Net2 going straight to .Net4 without the benefit of LINQ. –  Alex Aug 22 '11 at 9:42
    
The problem is 1. You don't tell us enough about the data (show us your tables) 2. You don't tell us what the SQL queries look like 3. You don't tell us how many rows get returned and are processed in that loop. That's what you need to expand on before anyone can have a chance at answering without guessing if what you're doing is worth optimising. The devil is in the detail when it comes to asking questions here. –  Kev Aug 22 '11 at 10:25

2 Answers 2

Whenever you are deciding where to put operations, you want to think of which tier/process is better geared for it.

Example, For mathematical operations, I would cringe if people tried to do Trigonometry functions or heavy math functions on a SQL/Oracle server.

From what I can see above, You have a huge list of questions and you're going to be inserting them into the database one at a time.

If you're going the LINQ route, do it fully, look at this link: http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/forums/en-US/linqprojectgeneral/thread/1a2c5ae8-8671-4863-a278-164cc51bd7d2/

to do multiple inserts with LINQ as it will make your code easier to read and will give you a performance boost.

To keep it similar to what you had:

logonName = Session["user"].ToString();

    string strSQL = "insertResults";
    var objDB01 = new dbconn();
    foreach (GridViewRow gvr in GridView1.Rows)
    {
        RadioButtonList rb = gvr.FindControl("answers_list") as RadioButtonList;
        var quest = rb.SelectedValue;

        if (quest == "")
        {
            quest = "0";
        }

        int questionId = Convert.ToInt32(GridView1.DataKeys[gvr.RowIndex].Values[0].ToString());
        int groupId = Convert.ToInt32(GridView1.DataKeys[gvr.RowIndex].Values[1].ToString());
        int question = Convert.ToInt32(quest);

        objDB01.objCommand.Clear();
        objDB01.objCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue("@userId", logonName);
        objDB01.objCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue("@groupId", groupId);
        objDB01.objCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue("@questionId", questionId);
        objDB01.objCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue("@answer", question);

        objDB01.GetNonQuery(strSQL);
    }

    //CLOSE YOUR CONNECTION if dispose does not directly invoke close.  
    objDB01.Dispose();

Edit: If you are looking for performance, and you're doing over 100 inserts, consider using the following approach: http://blog.sqlauthority.com/2007/06/08/sql-server-insert-multiple-records-using-one-insert-statement-use-of-union-all/

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3  
[citation needed] on your first paragraph –  Austin Salonen Aug 19 '11 at 16:31
1  
It might be their house style; but its not a universally recognized as a bad thing. We use var consistently exactly because we know what the type is and its considered to be easier to read then duplicating type names. var itemList = GroupListProvider.GetItems(); is nicer then IList<Provider.Item> itemList = GroupListProvider.GetItems(); –  Russ C Aug 19 '11 at 16:31
1  
Hang on, you're saying var is bad and then multiple linq inserts are faster ? wow ... –  Russ C Aug 19 '11 at 16:32
    
I'm saying var j = ThisObject.value.ToString() is bad because you already know you're dealing with a string, a reference. Using var to work with IEnumerables or other objects returned from LINQ or an anonymous function is another thing all together. var can take away from the intention of the object. is it an int, or an int? which in some cases is a big difference. Or var person = new { Name = "Peter", Age=4}; that is a good use of var (in my oppinion, which i have reflected in my post) :) –  Ryan Ternier Aug 19 '11 at 16:37
    
The anonymous type usage you just mentioned is a required use of var so of course it's good... –  Austin Salonen Aug 19 '11 at 16:44

Instead of storing the data in a relational format, in this case it might be better to store the entire question set as a BLOB or XML and then serializing and deserializing the data back and forth from the database. The downside to this approach is that the data will not able to be queryable from a SQL prospective, but it should be just one database operation to read and write the data from the database.

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Considering all the comments here - mostly off topic... I will re-word my question. –  Alex Aug 22 '11 at 9:38

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