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I think this would take O(A x B) time to execute.

(where A is the size of collectionA and B is the size of collectionB)

Am I correct?

IEnumerable<A> GetMatches(IEnumerable<A> collectionA, IEnumerable<B> collectionB)
{
    foreach (A a in collectionA)
        foreach (B b in collectionB)
            if (a.Value == b.Value)
                yield return a;
}

Is there a faster way to execute this query? (maybe using LINQ?)

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Enumerable.Intersect will not, unfortunately, work as you're comparing against two separate types (A and B).

This will require a bit of handling separately to get an Intersect call that will work.

You could do this in stages:

IEnumerable<A> GetMatches(IEnumerable<A> collectionA, IEnumerable<B> collectionB)
     where A : ISomeConstraintWithValueProperty
     where B : ISomeOtherConstraintWithSameValueProperty
{
    // Get distinct values in A
    var values = new HashSet<TypeOfValue>(collectionB.Select(b => b.Value));

    return collectionA.Where(a => values.Contains(a.Value));
}

Note that this will return duplicates if collectionB contains duplicates (but not collectionA), so it will have slightly different results than your looping code.

If you want unique matches (only one returned), you could change the last line to:

return collectionA.Where(a => values.Contains(a.Value)).Distinct();
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1  
I would suggest reversing which collection you work with when, i.e. consume collectionB eagerly and then stream collectionA - just because that fits in better with what the rest of LINQ to Objects does. –  Jon Skeet Aug 19 '11 at 16:29
    
@Jon: Good point - also noticed a bug I had in there (for this to work the HashSet needs to be a hash on the values, not the objects themselves...) That more of what you were thinking? –  Reed Copsey Aug 19 '11 at 16:31
    
What about the complexity of this solution? –  asmo Aug 19 '11 at 17:37
1  
@asmo: Much better, as HashSet.Contains is O(1)... You still are enumerating all of A, but that's far better than the quadratic approach above. –  Reed Copsey Aug 19 '11 at 17:51
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You may try the following intersection algorithm which has complexity O(m+n) if your data is sorted, or O(nlogn) otherwise, without consuming additional memory:

    private static IEnumerable<A> Intersect(A[] alist, B[] blist)
    {
        Array.Sort(alist);
        Array.Sort(blist);

        for (int i = 0, j = 0; i < alist.Length && j < blist.Length;)
        {
            if (alist[i].Value == blist[j].Value)
            {
                yield return alist[i];
                i++;
                j++;
            }
            else
            {
                if (alist[i].Value < blist[j].Value)
                {
                    i++;
                }
                else
                {
                    j++;
                }
            }
        }
    }
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